Can someone calc these escape velocities?

  • Thread starter autisticmoose
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In summary, the conversation is about asking for the escape velocity at different distances from Earth, the moon, and the sun. The person being addressed is asking for units to be included and is also telling someone named Vanadium 50 to stop posting on their stuff.
  • #1
maybe this will make it easy for you to understand.

when in Earth at a radius of 9.27e4, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

when in the moon at a radius of 2.14e4, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

when in the sun at a radius of 6.43e6, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

see...!

and if you can't understand that then please please stop posting on my stuff.

thanks
 
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  • #2
autisticmoose said:
maybe this will make it easy for you to understand.

Maybe this will make what easy to understand?

autisticmoose said:
when in Earth at a radius of 9.27e4, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

when in the moon at a radius of 2.14e4, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

when in the sun at a radius of 6.43e6, you tell me what the escape velocity is?

I can't answer any of these, because you haven't included units.

autisticmoose said:
see...!

See what?

autisticmoose said:
and if you can't understand that then please please stop posting on my stuff.

Who are you talking to here?
 
  • #3
He's talking to Vanadium 50, he locked his other thread. This one will be too.
 

1. What is an escape velocity?

An escape velocity is the minimum speed an object needs to reach in order to break free from the gravitational pull of a larger object, like a planet or a star.

2. How is escape velocity calculated?

The formula for escape velocity is v = √(2GM/r), where v is the velocity, G is the gravitational constant, M is the mass of the larger object, and r is the distance from the center of mass to the object's starting position.

3. Can escape velocity be different for different objects?

Yes, the escape velocity will vary depending on the mass and size of the object with the gravitational pull, as well as the distance between the two objects.

4. What is the escape velocity of Earth?

The escape velocity of Earth is approximately 11.2 kilometers per second (km/s) or 6.95 miles per second (mi/s).

5. How is escape velocity important in space travel?

Escape velocity is important in space travel because it determines the amount of energy and speed needed to break free from a planet or a star's gravity and enter into orbit or travel to another celestial body.

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