Can someone explain this fluids formula to me?

  • Thread starter fernancb
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement


The question pertains to hydrostatic lifts. So, assuming you have a lift and you're applying pressure to one side and the other side is rising:

P0 + P1 = P0 + P2 + (rho)gh

Now, when we look at the equation, why is it (rho)gh? I'm thinking it's something like mgh, so to convert it to fluids it would be (rho)Vgh why is this?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
cjl
Science Advisor
1,864
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rho*g*h is the hydrostatic pressure due to the gravity force on a fluid. Basically, the force a column of fluid will exert on a region beneath it is equal to the mass of the fluid times the acceleration of gravity, or m*g. Mass can also be written as density multiplied by volume, so m*g = rho*v*g. Now, per unit area, the volume of fluid is simply the height of the fluid column, so the force per unit area is equal to rho*g*h.
 
  • #3
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Okay, so the force exerted depends just on the the mass/volume/height of the fluid above it. Not the area. Did I get that right?
 

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