Can someone explain why Graphene does not qualify for Quantum Physics Forum?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the relevance and importance of graphene in the field of quantum physics and its potential for practical applications. The topic was initially posted in the General Physics section but was moved to the "Rod Stewart" section, leading to confusion and frustration. However, it is acknowledged that the Nobel Prize announcement for graphene may not necessarily be directly related to quantum mechanics. The conversation ends with a discussion on the properties and potential of spin qubits in graphene quantum dots.
  • #1
DevilsAvocado
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Could someone please explain why the thread https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=435072"?

Not that I have anything against General Physics, but it seems like maybe topics like "Cleaning your PC with a vacuum cleaner", "Rock On Rod Stewart", "My Air Mattress as a Pressure Vessel", "Kevlar and knives", "Throwing a ball in my office", etc, is predominant.

If Graphene were only about "Scotch tape & Pencils", I would have understood the "movement". But that’s not right, is it?

As far as I understand, Graphene has already, and will in the future be very important for the progress of quantum physics.
http://static.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2010/info_publ_phy_10_en.pdf"[/URL]
...
[B]Graphene also allows scientists to test for some of the more ghost-like quantum effects that so far only have been discussed theoretically[/B]. One such phenomenon is a variant of Klein tunelling, which was formulated by the Swedish physicist Oskar Klein in 1929. The tunnel effect in quantum physics describes how particles can sometimes pass through a barrier that would normally block them. The larger the barrier the smaller the chance of quantum particles passing through. However, this does not apply to electrons traveling in graphene – in some circumstances they move ahead as if the barrier did not even exist.
...[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE][PLAIN]http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2010/press.html"[/URL]
...
However, with graphene, physicists can now study a new class of two-dimensional materials with unique properties. [B]Graphene makes experiments possible that give new twists to the phenomena in quantum physics[/B]. Also a vast variety of practical applications now appear possible including the creation of new materials and the manufacture of innovative electronics. Graphene transistors are predicted to be substantially faster than today’s silicon transistors and result in more efficient computers.
...[/QUOTE]


Talking about quantum physics and computers: What could possibly be more interesting than [PLAIN]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spin_qubit"[/URL]?
[QUOTE][SIZE="1"][B][url]http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v3/n3/abs/nphys544.html[/url][/B][/SIZE]

[SIZE="3"][B]Spin qubits in graphene quantum dots[/B][/SIZE]

Björn Trauzettel, Denis V. Bulaev, Daniel Loss and Guido Burkard
Nature Physics 3, 192 - 196 (2007)
doi:10.1038/nphys544

Abstract: The main characteristics of good qubits are long coherence times in combination with fast operating times. It is well known that carbon-based materials could increase the coherence times of spin qubits, which are among the most developed solid-state qubits. Here, we propose how to form spin qubits in graphene quantum dots. A crucial requirement to achieve this goal is to find quantum-dot states where the usual valley degeneracy in bulk graphene is lifted. [B]We show that this problem can be avoided in quantum dots based on ribbons of graphene with armchair boundaries. The most remarkable new feature of the proposed spin qubits is that, in an array of many qubits, it is possible to couple any two of them via Heisenberg exchange with the others being decoupled by detuning. This unique feature is a direct consequence of the quasi-relativistic spectrum of graphene.[/B]

[SIZE="1"](Also at [url]http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0611252[/url])[/SIZE][/QUOTE]


A search on arXiv.org for [I]Graphene[/I] under [I]quant-ph[/I] gives [URL]http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/abs:+Graphene/0/1/0/all/0/1?per_page=100"[/URL]...

[B]So could someone please explain what’s going on?[/B]

It’s quite useless to spend a lot of your private time in finding information about new physics, if the information without any reasonable explanation is dumped in the "Rod Stewart" section...?:confused:?
 
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  • #2
I suppose because Nobel prize announcements, as interesting as they are, aren't really related to quantum mechanics in-themselves.
 
  • #3
what alxm said

Nobel Prize material is just likely to be moved to General Physics

I haven't seen the post, but if it was just focusing on graphene itself then I agree with you, it shouldn't have been moved

also: umad
 
  • #4
The topic of discussion can be found here: https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?p=2919916#post2919916

I just now posted to the topic. "The Nobel Committee said that the physicists, based at the University of Manchester, have shown that an extremely thin form of carbon just one atom thick had exceptional properties originating in the world of quantum physics."

You can review that quote by following the link (url) I just provided. Thanks and have a great day. :biggrin:
 

Related to Can someone explain why Graphene does not qualify for Quantum Physics Forum?

1. Why is graphene not considered a part of quantum physics?

Graphene is not considered a part of quantum physics because it is a material that can be described by classical physics and does not exhibit the quantum phenomena that are typically studied in the field of quantum physics.

2. What is the difference between graphene and quantum materials?

The main difference between graphene and quantum materials is that graphene is a two-dimensional material made up of a single layer of carbon atoms, while quantum materials are three-dimensional materials that exhibit quantum behavior such as superconductivity and quantum entanglement.

3. Can graphene be used in quantum computers?

While graphene itself is not a quantum material, it has been used in research on quantum computing as a potential component due to its unique electrical and mechanical properties. However, it is not yet clear if graphene will be a key component in future quantum computers.

4. Is graphene affected by quantum mechanics at all?

While graphene itself does not exhibit quantum behavior, it can be affected by quantum mechanics through its interactions with other materials or in certain experimental setups. However, it does not qualify as a quantum material in its own right.

5. Are there any potential applications of graphene in the field of quantum physics?

While graphene is not a part of quantum physics, it has been used in research on quantum technologies such as sensors, transistors, and optoelectronics. It also has potential applications in quantum computing, as mentioned earlier, but further research is needed to determine its viability in this field.

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