Can the SM accomodate an anti-Higgs boson?

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In summary, there is no such thing as an anti-Higgs boson and the Higgs boson is its own antiparticle. It is possible for two Higgs bosons to be produced on a collision course, but the Higgs boson itself decays quickly, making the process rare and difficult to measure. In new physics, this process could become more frequent. This interaction would not be something we could replicate and may have occurred around the time of inflation.
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Jim
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I naively imagine that a higgs & an a-higgs can annihilate by photon emission, similar to all SM particles. Is this a-higgs permitted by the SM & does the discovery of the higgs strongly suggest the a-higgs exists ?
 
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  • #2
Sorry, but there is no such thing as an anti-Higgs boson. That particular combination of words has no meaning.
 
  • #3
Jim said:
I naively imagine that a higgs & an a-higgs can annihilate by photon emission, similar to all SM particles. Is this a-higgs permitted by the SM & does the discovery of the higgs strongly suggest the a-higgs exists ?
Higgs bosons are their own antiparticle and would annihilate each other.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_boson#Properties_of_the_Higgs_boson
 
  • #4
This is an interesting question.
Let me restate it like this: what is the weak isospin and weak hypercharge of Higgs boson?

If they are zero, then how Higgs field with these charges being zero manages to constantly flip e.g. right-chirality electron into left-chirality electron - eR and eL have _different_ weak isospin and weak hypercharge, right?

If they are nonzero, then Higgs particle can't be its own antiparticle.
 
  • #5
nikkkom said:
This is an interesting question.
Let me restate it like this: what is the weak isospin and weak hypercharge of Higgs boson?

If they are zero, then how Higgs field with these charges being zero manages to constantly flip e.g. right-chirality electron into left-chirality electron - eR and eL have _different_ weak isospin and weak hypercharge, right?

If they are nonzero, then Higgs particle can't be its own antiparticle.
Way above my head, the Wikipedia article sites an NPR interview with Sean Carroll as its source for this info:
http://www.npr.org/2012/07/06/156380366/at-long-last-the-higgs-particle-maybe
There's not an anti-Higgs. It depends on the particle. Sometimes particles are essentially their own anti-particle. Like the photon doesn't have a separate anti-particle, and neither does the Higgs.
 
  • #6
stoomart said:
Higgs bosons are their own antiparticle and would annihilate each other.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_boson#Properties_of_the_Higgs_boson
Even if wikipedia were an accepted source under the Physics Forums rules (and it's not), that wikipedia article doesn't support your claim. Yes, it says that the Higgs boson is its own antiparticle, but it does not say anything about annihilation. The same is true of the NPR interview (which is also not peer-reviewed).
 
  • #7
If it would be possble to produce two Higgs bosons on a collision course: Higgs+Higgs -> something else is a possible process, but the Higgs itself decays to "something else" extremely fast, therefore that process has no relevance. Calling it annihilation is a bit of a stretch anyway.

Something else -> two Higgs bosons, on the other hand, is an interesting process searched for at the LHC (the Higgs bosons decay quickly afterwards). In the Standard Model is it extremely rare, and the experiments will need 10+ years to measure it. New physics could make it more frequent.
 
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  • #8
mfb said:
If it would be possble to produce two Higgs bosons on a collision course, Higgs+Higgs -> something else is a possible process, but the Higgs itself decays to "something else" extremely fast, therefore that process has no relevance. Calling it annihilation is a bit of a stretch anyway.
I assumed it would not be an interaction we could replicate, more like something going on around the time of inflation.
 

Related to Can the SM accomodate an anti-Higgs boson?

1. Can the Standard Model accommodate an anti-Higgs boson?

Yes, the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics allows for the existence of an anti-Higgs boson. The SM predicts that every particle has an anti-particle with the same mass but opposite charge. Therefore, if the Higgs boson exists, an anti-Higgs boson should also exist according to the SM.

2. What is the difference between a Higgs boson and an anti-Higgs boson?

A Higgs boson and an anti-Higgs boson are essentially the same particle, but with opposite charges. The Higgs boson has a positive charge while the anti-Higgs boson has a negative charge. They also have opposite quantum numbers, which describe their fundamental properties.

3. How can we detect an anti-Higgs boson?

An anti-Higgs boson can be detected through its interactions with other particles. In particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scientists can accelerate particles to nearly the speed of light and collide them, producing new particles such as the Higgs boson and its anti-particle. By analyzing the decay products of these collisions, scientists can identify the presence of an anti-Higgs boson.

4. Are there any experimental results or evidence supporting the existence of an anti-Higgs boson?

At this time, there is no experimental evidence for the existence of an anti-Higgs boson. However, the SM predicts its existence and scientists are actively searching for it in experiments at the LHC and other particle accelerators around the world.

5. Could the discovery of an anti-Higgs boson change our understanding of the Higgs mechanism?

If an anti-Higgs boson is discovered, it would confirm the predictions of the SM and further validate the Higgs mechanism. It would also provide a deeper understanding of the fundamental forces and particles in the universe. However, it is possible that the discovery of an anti-Higgs boson could also lead to new theories and ideas about the Higgs mechanism and the nature of particles.

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