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Canadian Universities for Theoretical Physics?

  1. Mar 7, 2009 #1
    Hi, right now Im a grade 11 student in Ontario, Canada. Ive been captivated by theoretical physics for some time now and I really want to try persuing a career in it (ideally in string theory/ other beyond the standard model stuff but anything in quantum mechanics would still be great). So my question was, are there any good universities in Canada to study theoretical physics? What averages would I need to get into these programs, and is there a realistic chance of me finding a career in the field after graduation?

    Ive tried checking out university websites, but I cant really find that much information.

    Thanks for your help,
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 7, 2009 #2
    You're only in your 11th grade. Keep it cool, and start by doing your undergraduate studies. A lot of people change their minds (myself included) upon the field of research they want to go to. I wanted do to string theory when I was your age, and I'm finally going in condensed matter physics. Your perspective on life change when you get older.

    I would suggest you do your undergraduate studies at a nearby university and then, if you still want to do string theory/other theoritical fields, then you move to a University more suitable for your needs.

    McGill has a very good reputation, some string theorists there. There's also the Perimeter Institute which is only for graduate studies specialized in theoritical physics. You might want to check University of British Columbia. I'm not sure about string theory, but University of Toronto has a very high reputation too.
     
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