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Centrifugal speed (MPH) converted to G's

  1. Nov 15, 2015 #1
    HI, let's save introductions till later, I'd like to get right to it.

    two questions:

    If a person weighs 100 lbs and is on a centrifuge spinning at 1,000 MPH, what is the G-force exerted by his body?
    If a person weighs 100 lbs and is on a centrifuge spinning at 500 MPH, what is the G-force exerted by his body?

    thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 15, 2015 #2

    CWatters

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    You can't spin in "miles per hour".
     
  4. Nov 15, 2015 #3
    Hi F Mills:

    You need to also know the radius of motion. How far from the axis of rotation are you?

    See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_orbit .

    Regards,
    Buzz
     
  5. Nov 15, 2015 #4
    Yeah, that's the problem I'm getting when googling speed to G force calculators, can you do some conversions and come up with an answer, it's over my head.
     
  6. Nov 15, 2015 #5

    berkeman

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    Welcome to the PF.

    See the wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centripetal_force

    And use F = mv^2/r. Be sure to keep your units consistent (like meters, kilograms and seconds).

    What is the context of your question? Going to be flying a fighter jet soon and want to know what to expect? :smile:
     
  7. Nov 15, 2015 #6
    3,959 miles (6,371 kilometers) one revolution per 23 hours 56 minutes and 4 seconds.
     
  8. Nov 15, 2015 #7
    Calculating g force applied to 100 lb person on the equator of earth.
     
  9. Nov 15, 2015 #8

    CWatters

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