CERN and Switzerland Prevail: Celebrating a Historical Moment!

In summary: Dark matter is theorized to be made of particles that do not interact with electromagnetic force, so it's possible that we won't see any hints of it until we reach the Planck epoch.- As for extra dimensions, that's something that has been theorized for a long time, and we haven't seen any evidence for it yet.In summary, the LHC collided protons at 7TeV, and initial results show some promising signs for new physics. We may not know the answer to all of the questions we are asking for a long time, but this is an incredible time for physics nonetheless.
  • #1
DevilsAvocado
Gold Member
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This is a historical moment – CERN and Switzerland did not turn into a Black Hole! :biggrin:

Here are some pictures and video from the event:


The two beams getting aligned for collision
1003062_08-A5-at-72-dpi.jpg

http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2010/1003062/1003062_08/1003062_08-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg"


The Atlas detector showing first results
1003060_02-A5-at-72-dpi.jpg

http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2010/1003060/1003060_02/1003060_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg"


The CMS detector showing first results
1003058_06-A5-at-72-dpi.jpg

http://mediaarchive.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2010/1003058/1003058_06/1003058_06-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg"


First collisions of protons at 7TeV (centre of mass energy) at the Large Hadron Collider on the 30th March 2010, reported from the control centre at CERN.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PE4dCTrWjU0&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x006699&color2=0x54abd6"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PE4dCTrWjU0&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x006699&color2=0x54abd6" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>


What's your guess? Will we find the Higgs boson, or maybe extra dimensions??

Exciting times... this is the closest to the Big Bang humans ever been...
 
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  • #2


I am on the edge of my seat now! I was a bit let down last year when things went hay wire. I wonder how long it will take to analyze all the data from just that single collision, let alone the several collisions per week? We are in an incredible time for physics that much is for sure.
 
  • #3


Agent M27 said:
I am on the edge of my seat now!
I've fallen of twice already today! :smile:
Agent M27 said:
I wonder how long it will take to analyze all the data from just that single collision, let alone the several collisions per week? We are in an incredible time for physics that much is for sure.
I have no good answer, but today there were about 40 collisions/sec. Later the frequency will be much much higher (bunch crossing interval of 75 ns?). It will take years to finally analyze the result in the LHC Computing Grid (detectors provide approximately 300 GB/s, and stream about 300 MB/s raw data to the Grid, expected to generate 27 TB of raw data per day).

But maybe we will get some astonishing hints on new physics before that...

Here's what's on the "LHC Menu":
  • The Higgs mechanism for generating elementary particle masses via electroweak symmetry breaking.
  • Is supersymmetry an extension of the Standard Model? That may clear up the mystery of Dark Matter.
  • Are there extra dimensions, as predicted by various models inspired by string theory?
  • Are electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force and the weak nuclear force just different manifestations of a single unified force, as predicted by various Grand Unification Theories?
  • Why is gravity so many orders of magnitude weaker than the other three fundamental forces?
  • Are there additional sources of quark flavours?
  • Why are there apparent violations of the symmetry between matter and antimatter?
  • What was the nature of the quark-gluon plasma in the early universe?

Yes, this is truly thrilling, and I have a question for the pros:

As I understand this; when LHC is looking for quark-gluon plasma (QGP), we are talking about the first hundred microseconds (10-6) or so, in the early evolution of universe.

- When looking for supersymmetry and a single unified force, we are in the Grand unification epoch and the Planck epoch, talking about nanoseconds (10-9). How far towards t0 (BB) can we get with the LHC?
 
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What is CERN and why is it important?

CERN stands for the European Organization for Nuclear Research and it is one of the world's largest and most prestigious scientific research centers. It is known for operating the largest particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is used to study the fundamental particles and forces that make up our universe.

What is the significance of Switzerland in this historical moment?

Switzerland is the host country of CERN and has been since its establishment in 1954. The country has played a crucial role in the development and operation of CERN, providing financial and logistical support, as well as a favorable political and cultural environment for scientific research. Therefore, the celebration of this historical moment is a recognition of Switzerland's contributions to the scientific community.

What is being celebrated in this historical moment?

The celebration marks the 60th anniversary of CERN and Switzerland's 50th anniversary as a member state of the organization. It also commemorates the successful completion of the LHC's first run and the discovery of the Higgs boson particle in 2012, which was a major scientific breakthrough.

What are some of the achievements of CERN and Switzerland in the field of science and technology?

CERN and Switzerland have made numerous groundbreaking discoveries and advancements in the field of particle physics, including the discovery of the W and Z bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson. They have also developed groundbreaking technologies such as the World Wide Web and have contributed to advancements in medical imaging and radiation therapy.

How does CERN benefit society?

CERN's research has a wide range of applications and benefits for society. It has improved our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature and has led to technological advancements in various fields such as medicine, energy, and computing. CERN also promotes international collaboration and has a strong commitment to education and outreach, inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers.

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