Chemistry of thyroid hormones doesn't make sense?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of coupling reactions and their difference from addition reactions. The participants also touch upon the potential involvement of enzymes in this type of reaction.
  • #1
sameeralord
662
3
Hello everyone,

This is a DIT molecule.

displayImage.do?defaultImage=true&imageIndex=0&chebiId=15768.png


Now the book says there is a coupling reaction DIT + DIT ----> gives T4 molecule or tyroxine hormone

Now this is how T4 looks like

thyroxine.gif


I don't understand how you can get this when there is a addition reaction between these two. Does coupling mean something else. Thank you :smile:
 
Chemistry news on Phys.org
  • #3
pzona said:
Coupling reactions are something entirely different from addition. Here's the basics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_reaction

Thanks :smile: Somehow I totally forgot to check what coupling reaction mean, I just took it literally thinking it was an addition reaction.
 
  • #4
This is almost certainly an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. I'm guessing that by 'coupling reaction' they just mean that it's occurring in a metalloenzyme.

Even without knowing the enzyme in question I'd expect as much, given the nature of the reaction. Substitution on a phenyl ring is not easy, and might even require forming a radical intermediate.
 
  • #5


Hello,

I can understand your confusion about the chemistry behind thyroid hormones. However, the coupling reaction described in your book is a common reaction in organic chemistry called a condensation reaction. In this reaction, two molecules combine to form a larger molecule with the release of a smaller molecule, usually water. This type of reaction is different from addition reactions, where two molecules simply combine without the release of any byproducts.

In the case of thyroid hormones, the two DIT molecules undergo a condensation reaction to form a larger molecule called T4 or thyroxine. This is a key step in the synthesis of thyroid hormones in the body. While it may seem counterintuitive that two molecules can combine to form a larger molecule, this type of reaction is actually quite common in biological systems.

I hope this explanation helps to clarify the chemistry of thyroid hormones for you. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask. As scientists, it is important for us to constantly question and seek understanding in order to further our knowledge and make new discoveries. Thank you for your curiosity and interest in this topic.

Best,
 

Related to Chemistry of thyroid hormones doesn't make sense?

1. What is the chemistry behind thyroid hormones?

Thyroid hormones, also known as T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), are made up of two tyrosine amino acids and three or four iodine atoms. The chemical structure of these hormones allows them to bind to specific receptors in the body and regulate various physiological processes.

2. How do thyroid hormones affect the body?

Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, growth and development, body temperature, and heart rate. They also affect other functions such as digestion, muscle control, and mood.

3. Why does the chemistry of thyroid hormones matter?

The chemical structure of thyroid hormones is important because it determines their function and effectiveness in the body. Any imbalances or abnormalities in the chemistry of these hormones can lead to various health issues, such as hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

4. What factors can affect the chemistry of thyroid hormones?

The production and regulation of thyroid hormones are influenced by several factors, including diet, stress, genetics, and certain medications. Environmental factors, such as exposure to toxins, can also impact the chemistry of these hormones.

5. Can the chemistry of thyroid hormones be altered or corrected?

In cases where there are imbalances or abnormalities in the chemistry of thyroid hormones, medication and lifestyle changes can help correct the levels. However, in some cases, such as congenital disorders, the chemistry of these hormones may not be able to be altered or corrected.

Similar threads

Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Chemistry
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
3
Views
994
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
233
Back
Top