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I Chernobyl Dose Model & Estimates

  1. Oct 13, 2016 #1
    Hello all,

    I've been tasked with developing a model for dose received from the Chernobyl Accident.

    I'm struggling a little to find dose estimates from which I can extrapolate back to find the initial dose received. Does anyone have any references that they can point me towards? I believe there was a dose estimate conducted 3 months, 6 months, and possible either 1 or 3 years after the accident but I'm having difficulty finding this data.

    In addition, does anyone have any recommendations on how I should develop this model?

    Thanks,
    Lily
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 13, 2016 #2

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to PF!

    What level of schooling is this assignment for?
     
  4. Oct 13, 2016 #3
    Hi Russ,

    Thank you! I'm currently in my fourth year, and it's for an undergraduate thesis project.

    -Lily
     
  5. Oct 16, 2016 #4
    If anyone has any sources where dose rates in the area and surrounding regions have been published, please let me know!
    -Lily
     
  6. Oct 16, 2016 #5
    You should watch the documentary "pandoras promise" and the BBC doc horizon "Is nuclear power safe", the BBC one interviews a Russian scientist who compiled the doses v effects. i believe his research is publicly available.
    One thing i will add, interestingly people still live in Chernobyl, and the radiation levels are lower than some beaches in south america!
    good luck.
     
  7. Oct 16, 2016 #6

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    The IAEA and various regulatory/research institutions have compiled or issued reports on the Chernobyl event, including the dispersal of radionuclides from the core.
    https://www-ns.iaea.org/downloads/rw/meetings/environ-consequences-report-wm-08.05.pdf
    https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/chernobyl.pdf

    One could look at basic plume models and see how well they would predict the dispersion and deposition. Many models may be based on a burst release, such that the initial release event is short term, rather than in the case of Chernobyl, the release was over 10 days. Wind direction and speed, and precipitation will add to the inhomogeneity of the dose rate and thus dose.

    One can search Google with "IAEA, Chernobyl, dose rates over time" and find plenty of reports. OECD's NEA also has reports.

    https://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/chernobyl/ [Broken]
    https://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/chernobyl/c04.html
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  8. Oct 16, 2016 #7

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    The IAEA and various regulatory/research institutions have compiled or issued reports on the Chernobyl event, including the dispersal of radionuclides from the core.
    https://www-ns.iaea.org/downloads/rw/meetings/environ-consequences-report-wm-08.05.pdf
    https://www.iaea.org/sites/default/files/chernobyl.pdf

    One could look at basic plume models and see how well they would predict the dispersion and deposition. Many models may be based on a burst release, such that the initial release event is short term, rather than in the case of Chernobyl, the release was over 10 days. Wind direction and speed, and precipitation will add to the inhomogeneity of the dose rate and thus dose.

    One can search Google with "IAEA, Chernobyl, dose rates over time" and find plenty of reports. OECD's NEA also has reports.

    https://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/chernobyl/
    https://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/chernobyl/c04.html
     
  9. Oct 16, 2016 #8
    Thanks a bunch for the references!! I will definitely take a look at them in detail.

    I should have perhaps clarified; I'm not going to be modelling the dose over time delivered; I simply needed to find the data and then estimate what the initial dose received was (this is what I'm looking for, to be used in experiments). For example, what was the initial, acute dose delivered as a result of Chernobyl in the surrounding area?

    Thanks
     
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