Choosing a UK university for physics wrt international PhDs

In summary, the person is in the process of choosing a university for their first degree and is also considering doing a PhD at a good international university in the US or Europe. They are asking for information on the international recognition of the universities they are considering (UCL, Manchester, Warwick, Nottingham) and if any of them are academically weak. The person also mentions that they are considering applying to top universities like Cambridge, Oxford, and Imperial, but were put off by a sibling's negative experience. They are also advised to research and prepare for the GRE exams if they want to apply to US universities. Finally, it is mentioned that admission to top US universities is highly competitive and not guaranteed, even with a good academic record and GRE scores
  • #1
Lutzee
9
0
Hey,

I am in the process of choosing which univeristy I want to go to do my first degree. I am am also thinking about doing a PhD after I finish my first degree. I would like to do this PhD at a good international university in the US or in wider europe e.g MIT. With that in mind could somebody please tell me if:

a) If these universitys are recognised internationally for physics

b) Which is the the most best recognised internationally i.e. which one am I most likely to get into a good university abroad with a first degree from that university.

c) If you would think of any of them as academically weak

The universitys I am choosing from:

UCL (University College London)
Manchester University
Warwick University
Nottingham University

Thanks for your time.
 
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  • #2
They're all decent universities (top 20 or so). However, since you're already thinking that you'll want to do a PhD at institutions of the likes of MIT, it seems strange that you wouldn't apply to the best universities (cambridge, oxford, imperial, etc..)
 
  • #3
cristo said:
They're all decent universities (top 20 or so). However, since you're already thinking that you'll want to do a PhD at institutions of the likes of MIT, it seems strange that you wouldn't apply to the best universities (cambridge, oxford, imperial, etc..)

My sister went to cambridge and really hated it. It kinda put me off...

I also thought that as long as I got a 1st from a russel group uni I would be OK
 
  • #4
Fair enough, as long as you've got a reason! Yea, you should be fine with a first from any of those universities. However, note that to get into US universities' grad schemes it's not as easy as simply applying (which you also have to pay for over there!): you need to take two extra exams (called the GRE). Whilst this doesn't matter now, you should make sure you find out about these way before you are thinking of applying, so you can study for them. I considered applying to the US, but found out about the GRE way too late which would mean that studying for it would probably have affected my degree grades.
 
  • #5
So, to clarify you are saying as long as I get a 1st from one of those Unis, a good GRE score, do a good interview and good references from lecturers etc then I should be OK to do a PhD at a good US university e.g. MIT, ivy league etc
 
  • #6
Lutzee, the short answer is no. Nobody is guaranteed a spot at MIT or an Ivy. Each department (graduate admissions are done by individual departments) in those schools gets hundreds of applications for a dozen - perhaps two - places. It's possible to nothing wrong pre-grad school and still not get in.
 
  • #7
Vanadium 50 said:
Lutzee, the short answer is no. Nobody is guaranteed a spot at MIT or an Ivy. Each department (graduate admissions are done by individual departments) in those schools gets hundreds of applications for a dozen - perhaps two - places. It's possible to nothing wrong pre-grad school and still not get in.

In that case would you say that I would be on an equal starting point with everyone else(if I got the above?)
 

Related to Choosing a UK university for physics wrt international PhDs

1. What is the reputation of UK universities for physics internationally?

UK universities are well-known for their high quality and reputable physics programs. Many UK universities are ranked among the top universities in the world for physics, making them a popular choice for international students seeking a PhD in this field.

2. How do I find the best UK university for my specific research interests in physics?

You can start by researching the different universities in the UK and their physics departments. Look at their faculty profiles, research areas, and publications to see which university aligns with your research interests and goals. You can also reach out to current PhD students or professors in your field for their insights and recommendations.

3. Are there any specific requirements for international students to apply to a UK university for a physics PhD?

Each university may have its own specific requirements for international students, so it is important to carefully review the admission criteria of the universities you are interested in. Generally, international students will need to provide proof of English proficiency, academic transcripts, and letters of recommendation. Some universities may also require standardized test scores, such as the GRE.

4. Can I get funding as an international student for a physics PhD in the UK?

Many UK universities offer funding opportunities for international students, such as scholarships, grants, and research assistantships. It is important to research the funding options available at each university and apply for them early in the application process. You can also look into external funding sources, such as government scholarships or grants from international organizations.

5. What are the job prospects for international students with a physics PhD from a UK university?

A physics PhD from a UK university can open up many career opportunities for international students. With a high-quality education and training in a highly respected program, international students can find employment in various industries, such as research and development, academia, government agencies, and technology companies. Many UK universities also offer career support services to help international students with their job search after graduation.

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