Commercially available flywheels

  • Thread starter jamesson
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation discusses the use of flywheels in automobile transmissions and their suitability for a bicycle pedal equivalent. It is suggested to cannibalize an old stationary bike for a cheap flywheel. The possibility of using a mechanism to dynamically adjust input torque is mentioned, but it is unclear what input torque is being referred to. The idea of a combination pedal-powered generator/trainer is also mentioned, with the suggestion to examine commercial stands for design inspiration.
  • #1
jamesson
59
3
Do the flywheels used in automobile transmissions have input torque suitable for the equivalent of a bicycle pedal? If not, how troublesome is it to assemble a gearbox to create sufficient torque? Also, is there some mechanism I can use to dynamically (eletronically) adjust input torque? Are there any other commercially available flywheels I can look at?
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
jamesson said:
Are there any other commercially available flywheels I can look at?
To do what? It is hard to answer your question without the context of knowing what you are trying to accomplish. Do you want to add a flywheel to your bicycle?
 
  • #3
anorlunda said:
Do you want to add a flywheel to your bicycle?
...or replace the flywheel of a stationary bike? I bet you could cannibalize an old stationary bike for cheap.
jamesson said:
Also, is there some mechanism I can use to dynamically (eletronically) adjust input torque?
Input torque from what? A motor can have a speed/torque controller, often just by adjusting the voltage. A stationary bike typically uses either a mechanical brake or the equivalent of a generator (electromagnetic resistance).
 
  • #4
Yeah, you guys are right. It was silly of me to expect a good answer without explaining my plan. I'm looking into a combination pedal-powered generator/trainer that I could put a "normal" bike into without disassembling it.
 
  • #5
I suggest that you first examine pictures of commercial stands that do the same. See how they are designed. I just looked at several pictures on Google images and none of them use a flywheel. Search for something like:

Indoor Bike Trainer Portable Exercise Bicycle Magnetic Stand
 

Related to Commercially available flywheels

1. What is a commercially available flywheel?

A commercially available flywheel is a mechanical device that stores kinetic energy in the form of rotational motion. It consists of a heavy rotating disc or wheel that is mounted on a shaft and can spin freely on bearings. The energy is stored in the rotating mass of the flywheel and can be released as needed.

2. How does a flywheel work?

A flywheel works by converting electrical energy into rotational energy, which is stored in the spinning mass of the wheel. When the energy is needed, the flywheel releases the stored energy to power a device or system. This process is known as energy storage and can be repeated multiple times without any loss of efficiency.

3. What are the advantages of using a flywheel?

There are several advantages of using a flywheel as an energy storage device. Firstly, it has a high energy density, meaning it can store a large amount of energy in a small space. Secondly, it has a long lifespan and can be charged and discharged repeatedly without losing efficiency. Additionally, flywheels have fast response times and can provide power almost instantly when needed.

4. What are the common applications of commercially available flywheels?

Commercially available flywheels have a wide range of applications. They are commonly used in uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems, where they provide backup power in case of a power outage. Flywheels are also used in renewable energy systems, such as wind and solar power, to store excess energy for later use. They are also used in transportation systems, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, to store and release energy for propulsion.

5. What are the limitations of using a flywheel?

One of the main limitations of using a flywheel is its relatively low energy density compared to other energy storage technologies, such as batteries. This means that it may not be suitable for applications that require large amounts of energy to be stored. Additionally, flywheels can be expensive to manufacture and require precision engineering, making them less cost-effective for some applications. Finally, flywheels can also be heavy and bulky, making them less suitable for portable or mobile applications.

Similar threads

  • Mechanical Engineering
3
Replies
86
Views
6K
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
13
Views
747
Replies
8
Views
2K
Replies
21
Views
6K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
14
Views
10K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Back
Top