Completely Inelastic Collision

In summary, a completely inelastic collision is a type of collision where two or more objects collide and stick together, resulting in a single, combined object. Momentum is conserved in this type of collision, but kinetic energy is not. This is different from an elastic collision where the objects bounce off each other. Real-world examples of completely inelastic collisions include car crashes, bullet impacts, and merging drops of water.
  • #1
hateAleen
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After a completely inelastic collision, two objects of the same mass and same initial speed are found to move away together at 1/3 their initial speed. Find the angle between the initial velocities of the objects.

I think that this question is dealing with collisions in two dimensions. My textbook does not give any equations for completely inealstic collisions in two dimensions. Any help?
 
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  • #2
It just means they stick together, so you have a final particle of 2*mass
 
  • #3
I went through and ended up getting an answer of 45 degrees. But that ended up being wrong.
 

1. What is a completely inelastic collision?

A completely inelastic collision is a type of collision where two or more objects collide and stick together, resulting in a single, combined object. This type of collision is characterized by the conservation of momentum and the loss of kinetic energy.

2. How is momentum conserved in a completely inelastic collision?

In a completely inelastic collision, momentum is conserved because the total momentum of the system before the collision is equal to the total momentum after the collision. This means that the total mass and velocity of the objects involved in the collision will remain the same before and after the collision.

3. What happens to kinetic energy in a completely inelastic collision?

In a completely inelastic collision, kinetic energy is not conserved. Instead, some of the kinetic energy is converted into other forms of energy, such as heat, sound, or deformation of the objects involved in the collision.

4. How is a completely inelastic collision different from an elastic collision?

A completely inelastic collision is different from an elastic collision in that the objects involved in a completely inelastic collision stick together and move as one combined object, whereas in an elastic collision, the objects bounce off each other and retain their individual identities.

5. What are some real-world examples of completely inelastic collisions?

Some examples of completely inelastic collisions in everyday life include when a car collides with a barrier or another car, when a bullet hits a target and gets embedded in it, or when two drops of water merge together upon contact.

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