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Components of A Resultant Force

  1. May 1, 2012 #1
    The following problem is one I have contrived by my own ability, so if there is any error please let me know.

    Say I have a box, with a chain attached at one of the edges of the box, and I apply 10 N pull at a 40° angle with the surface of the box. Now I know we sometimes resolve vectors into their components for mere convenience of the addition of vectors. So in this case, we have a horizontal component of 7.7 N, and vertical component of 6.4 N. My question is: if I to pull with 6.4 N vertically, and a friend pull with 7.7 N horizontally, would the box accelerate in the same way if I were to only one force of 10 N at a 40° angle with the surface of the box?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2012 #2
    you got it!
    Two component vectors ARE equivalent to their total... just like 6.4 plus 7.7 equals 14.1....in that case the vectors point in the same direction....and if they were in opposite directions 6.4 - 7.7 is equivalent to -1.3....[signs are arbitrary]
     
  4. May 1, 2012 #3
    Wow, thanks!
     
  5. May 1, 2012 #4
    Yes, the accelaration in both cases would be the same because in both cases, he forces acting in the parallel and perpendicular directions would be the same, and since there is no question of variable mass, so the forces will produce the same accelaration.
     
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