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Computer Aided Mechanical Engineering

  1. Apr 20, 2015 #1
    I am 17 years old and aspiring to be an engineer. When I go to university next year the course I will be studying is Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering. I wanted to study just Mechanical Engineering however I did not get in to the university that does it and this is the only course that I want to do within the university I got into.
    I was wondering what people thought of Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering and what employers thought of it. I am worried that it is a bit too much on the design side of things to be classed as an engineering degree for some employers. What do you guys thing?
    Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 20, 2015 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Usually you get a BS degree in engineering or engineering tech and CADD courses are part of the program or supplemental in grad school. What sort of a degree will you be getting and what other courses will you be taking at this school ?
     
  4. Apr 28, 2015 #3
    Hey, sorry for the late reply! This is the course contents:
    Year 1: Provides a broad-based and solid coverage of the fundamentals of engineering

    Year 2: Thermodynamics & Fluid Mechanics, Engineering Design & Analysis, Mathematics, Professional Orientation & Practice, Control & Instrumentation Systems, Manufacture & Materials, Electrical Systems

    Year 3: Computer Aided Engineering, Energy Conversion Technologies, Manufacture & Materials, Engineering Design & Analysis, Integrated Studies, Engineering Management & Quality

    Year 4: Project, Finite Element Analysis, Engineering Design & Analysis, Simulation for Manufacturing, Renewable Energy Equipment Design, Computer Aided Design

    Year 5: MEng Team Project, Strategy & Innovation, Applied Thermofluids * CFD, Manufacturing Management, Advanced Computer-Aided Engineering.

    I am a little worried because I have heard that some employers see this degree as more of a design degree rather than engineering and I was wondering what you all thought of it. Thanks
     
  5. Apr 28, 2015 #4

    PhanthomJay

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    So I am not familiar with this degree, but after 5 years what is the actual degree is it bachelor or master of science in computer aided mechanical engineering or what?
     
  6. Apr 28, 2015 #5
    The legal definition of an engineer in many jurisdictions is "a person qualified to design." Sounds like you are worried that the degree may be just what you say you want while perhaps what you really want is something else altogether.
     
  7. Apr 28, 2015 #6

    russ_watters

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    In my field (building systems engineering), a "designer" is someone who does technical work in an engineering company, but is not an engineer.

    I've never heard of this degree, but if you want to be an engineer, my concern is that it may be an "engineering technology" degree and not an "engineering" degree. The distinction may matter. I'd search for jobs with it on Monster.com, check to see if it is abet accredited, check PE requirements (if applicable for your particular field), etc.
     
  8. Apr 28, 2015 #7

    PhanthomJay

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    That is my concern also. There is certainly a need for eng tech graduates, but in spite of claims to the contrary, a degree in Engineering technology is not the same as a degree in engineering, and I would hire an engineering degree graduate to do engineering work, and the engineering tech or CADD graduate I would hire to do more design and drafting work than engineering work, at least in the short term
     
  9. Apr 29, 2015 #8
    The degree title is BEng/BEng (Hons) Computer aided Mechanical engineering. I have only applied for the 4 year course, so do you think it would be more beneficial to get my masters at a different institute for MEng Degree in Mechanical Engineering?
     
  10. Apr 29, 2015 #9

    PhanthomJay

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    I really don't know if it would be that easy to get a Masters in ME at a different institute if you have only the BEng in Computer aided ME instead of the Bachelors in straight ME. Are you taking a bunch of different level courses over the next 4 years in Calculus and Physics?
     
  11. Apr 29, 2015 #10
    I'm not sure yet as I start the course in September. Should I do a year of work experience then try to apply again to different courses next year? The only reason I am doing this couse is because I didn't get into the University I wanted too for straight ME and this was the next closest thing I got into for ME. I spoke to my physics teacher about it (he was a ME then went into teaching) and he said he had never heard of it either but thought that the course sounded good. I'm just really stressed out right now by this :/

    The course is accredited by the institution of mechanical engineers.
     
  12. Apr 29, 2015 #11

    PhanthomJay

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    I am not sure of your circumstances as to why you did not get into a school that offers the full ME degree...perhaps because of financial reasons or only fair high school grades in math/physics? Does your first semester offer calculus and Intro physics courses (find out)? Did you enjoy math and physics in high school? How about applying next year or even in 2 years to a school that offers the full ME degree?
    I'll be honest, I prefer the full BS or MS degree in candidates I interview for engineering employment. In general, they are better prepared to handle the day to day engineering challenges, because the intensity of the course studies prepares them better . Like heck I mean even if you never use calculus in your engineering job (I seldom do), you still need a strong calculus background to be good in engineering (hard to explain that, but it is true...it disciplines you to think, and understand the engineering equations, etc.). Now others may disagree and say that a less than full engineering degree (like an engineering technology or your computer aided degree) makes no difference. But since a lot of interviewers are old timers, they are looking for full blown degrees.
    Also, besides the technical stuff, one of the most important requirements in engineering is to have good verbal and written communication skills. If you can't effectively convey your thoughts and ideas, you are at a big disadvantage. Calculations and drawings are not all that is required in the profession.
     
  13. Apr 29, 2015 #12
    Yeah the reason I didn't get into the better university was because my grades were not good enough (but I am working hard to improve my results!). I really do enjoy maths and physics and I am passionate about becoming a ME. I did research and it said the BEng is pretty much the same to a BS. The course does do calculus as it is a full engineering degree which is accredited. Perhaps things in the US are different than the UK (where I am from).
     
  14. Apr 29, 2015 #13

    PhanthomJay

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    Oh sorry I am not familiar with the Beng degree here in the US. So let me ask this: if you were accepted to the 'better ' university with the ME degree, what degree would you get upon graduation from that other school? Be specific.thanks
     
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