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Medical Concerning thoughts in my head.

  1. May 14, 2010 #1
    Hi, I have this thing where if I see someone this really negative thought about them will pop into my head about them, independent of my will, and it's growing in consistency. It'd be something awful like "you're so ugly" or "wow you're fat". Really disgusting stuff. It's turned into like a default neural pathway as soon as I see someone. I'm the opposite of a bad person and would never say anything to hurt someone. I'm the opposite of bigoted and racist, and I never stereotype, etc. I'm not a negative thinker. I'm the most generous person I know (not bragging). I volunteer at a homeless shelter. I don't value materialistic crap or looks. Wtf!?

    What the hell's going on? Does anyone else get this? I want it to stop.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 14, 2010 #2

    lisab

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    Well, we can't give diagnosis here, but I'm going to post under the assumption that what you're experiencing isn't a mental illness.

    If what you're experiencing can be described as a bad habit, you may be able to break yourself of it. Try wearing a rubber band around your wrist and giving a slight snap when you have one of these thoughts. The intent is just a slight snap, not a full on flagellation :tongue2:.

    I've tried this myself and found it an effective behavior modification technique, if the behavior isn't too ingrained and you're really motivated to change.
     
  4. May 14, 2010 #3
    That could work. I'll try a hard pinch, thanks!

    Yeah I'm pretty sure it's a bad habit. It's interesting to note that increasing prevalence of this is positively correlated with periods of when I rarely leave the house and just research and read. Perhaps a very subtle/minor social anxiety disorder.
     
  5. May 14, 2010 #4
    Lisa sounds right to me, not an illness. You can do more than pinch: You stop, write down or say out loud, "How do I feel now? What was I thinking before this thought came to me? How much of this thought is valid, how would I feel to have others think this of me? Does this thought ease some other emotional stress or distract me?"

    I would add, you can read of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, which does not reaquire a diagnosis. You WANT to change, this is step one, and if you have some anxiety that is clinical or sub-clinical CBT cannot hurt.
     
  6. May 14, 2010 #5

    DaveC426913

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    Huh. I was about to say the opposite. You could be suffering from a mild form of depression or (remotely possible) schizophrenia.

    If it does not go away on its own, you should mention it to your family doctor.
     
  7. May 14, 2010 #6
    If this were schizophrenia there would likely be patterns in his writing, and we could not diagnose. Without the ability to diagnose, the best way to do so is to offer treatment as diagnosis.
     
  8. May 14, 2010 #7

    DaveC426913

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    No, the best way is to refer him to his doctor. Offering him methods for coping could result in a delayed visit and delayed diagnosis.
     
  9. May 14, 2010 #8
    It sounds to me like something is in the back of your mind bothering you, something you're angry about, that's popping out in these knee-jerk mental hostilities. If you can figure out what it is and take care of it, you'll probably mellow out.
     
  10. May 14, 2010 #9

    DaveC426913

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    Well duh. It's ugly people and fat people.
     
  11. May 14, 2010 #10
    Thanks guys!

    I've only noticed it in the last 2 months, I've been sitting in my house pretty much reading and researching and haven't gone outside much. So I guess there could be some causal link, some kind of anxiety or something. I'll google CBT and try the writing it down thing and see if it works, thanks.
     
  12. May 14, 2010 #11
    Cognitive Therapy is excellent. The main book is called Feeling Good, by David Burns M.D.
    You should be able to get hold of it anywhere; the library for sure. It's very popular and there's about 40 billion copies in print.
     
  13. May 15, 2010 #12

    Monique

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