Correlation between size and mass of particles

In summary, the conversation discusses whether there is a correlation between the size of a matter particle and its mass, specifically in relation to its matter wavelength. While the de Broglie wavelength formula can provide an indirect sense of the particle's size, it is not a definitive measure as elementary particles are considered to be point-like. The conversation also addresses the difference between de Broglie wavelength and momentum and the OP's attempt to change the focus of the original question.
  • #1
Ranku
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Is there a correlation between the size of a matter particle (defined as its matter wavelength) and the mass of the particle? With the photon, its wavelength and its energy/mass are inversely correlated. Is it also true of matter particles?
 
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  • #2
Ranku said:
the size of a matter particle (defined as its matter wavelength

And what do you mean by "matter wavelength" and why should it be considered as particles size? If it's de Broglie wavelength then just check the formula for it.
 
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  • #3
de Broglie wavelength depends on the momentum of the particle, not its mass.
 
  • #4
weirdoguy said:
And what do you mean by "matter wavelength" and why should it be considered as particles size? If it's de Broglie wavelength then just check the formula for it.
How else to consider particle size?
 
  • #5
Well, elementary particles (like electron) are considered to be point-like, that is, they don't have size.
 
  • #6
weirdoguy said:
Well, elementary particles (like electron) are considered to be point-like, that is, they don't have size.
Since de Broglie wavelength = h/momentum = mass x velocity, that would give us an indirect sense of the ‘size‘ of the particle, in relation to its mass.
 
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  • #7
Ranku said:
that would give us an indirect sense of the ‘size‘ of the particle.

How?

Ranku said:
de Broglie wavelength = momentum

Nope, that's not the formula, but you're close.
 
  • #8
Thgis started out as a question with a simple answer - "there isn't one". Why are you (the OP) trying to morph this qu4estion into one with a different answer?
 
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