Coulomb's law, R is the inverse to F?

  • Thread starter Versus
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  • #1
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This isn't homework, just a bit of extra study that is annoying me. Can't really seem to get my head around this bit.

If you have a worked equation of Coulomb's law and all known variables; Force, Distance between two objects and the charge in Coulomb's, how do you represent this in a graph? I've read that you do the inverse of R^2 which for me is 0.15 metres. I understand that as R increases, the Force decreases and as Force increases, R decreases. How do you represent this on a graph? I don't exactly know how to mathematically represent this as an equation.

Okay so let me give you an example of what I have.

F= 3.4425x10^-5
R= 0.2 so R^2 = 0.04
Q1 = 17x10^-9
Q2 = 9x10^-9

The R is the initial distance though, how do I calculate the distance it has moved due to the force being applied? F=MA?

Need to set the graph up like this by the way, but obviously with numbers.

http://www.aplusphysics.com/courses/regents/electricity/images/InverseSquareLaw.png
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
16
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As far as graphing, you need to recognize that F is a function of r, F(r). So you treat r as you would any variable and graph it with the values for k and q given: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=Plot%5B%28%28%288.988%C3%9710^9%29%2817*10^-9%29%289*10^-9%29%29%2F%28r^2%29%29%2C{r%2C0%2C25}%5D
 

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