Creating Different Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide

In summary, the conversation discusses how to prepare various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for an experiment. The suggested method is to use mass percentages and dilution with water, with consideration for the density of the solutions. The 0% concentration is explained as a comparison to a situation with no effects. The conversation also briefly mentions the concept of density and its relation to mass and volume.
  • #1
Namkceis
8
0
< Mentor Note -- thread moved to HH from the technical forums, so no HH Template is shown >

The experiment I'm trying to do can be found in the attachment below.

Prepare 20 mL solutions of hydrogen peroxide in the following concentrations: 0%,0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%,
2.0%, 2.5%, 3.0% hydrogen peroxide.

I'm starting with hydrogen peroxide at 3% concentration. How do I to get these concentrations? What measurement tools do you need to do this? I'm not a chemist so I have no idea. Is it dilution?
 

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  • #2
Namkceis said:
Is it dilution?
Yes.
Namkceis said:
How do I to get these concentrations? What measurement tools
These are mass percentages. Properly you add a large enough mass of water to a weighed amount of 3 % solution so that the total mass of hydrogen peroxide divided by the total mass of solution is the percentage you're interested in having.

For practical purposes, you can consider the density of water and of starting and ending solutions to be one, and use a volumetric flask.
 
  • #3
The 0% concentration seems odd. It's just 20 ml of water.
 
  • #4
SteamKing said:
The 0% concentration seems odd
Odd, but not uncommon. Specifically states the obvious point that effects of a particular agent/reagent/compound are compared to situations where no effects are possible. A global specification would be that the solution be 0% {all 20-30M compounds listed in the CAS Registry}.
 
  • #5
Bystander said:
Yes.

These are mass percentages. Properly you add a large enough mass of water to a weighed amount of 3 % solution so that the total mass of hydrogen peroxide divided by the total mass of solution is the percentage you're interested in having.

For practical purposes, you can consider the density of water and of starting and ending solutions to be one, and use a volumetric flask.

Thank you for your response and willingness to assist me.

total mass of hydrogen peroxide / total mass of solution = % concentration after dilution

example:
x / 1 = 0.5%
x = 0.5%

total solution = 20 mL

20 mL - 0.5 = 19.5 mL

or is it...

20 mL - 0.005 = 19.995 mL

-----------------------------------
How does density fit into all this?
I know Density = Mass / Volume.
The density of water is 999.97 kg/m3 = Mass / Volume. Is the mass 20 mL?
 
Last edited:
  • #6
Namkceis said:
My bachelors degree required many philosophy credits so I know a bit about philosophy.
Namkceis said:
x = 0.5%
total solution = 20 mL
20 mL - 0.5 = 19.5 mL
or is it...
20 mL - 0.005 = 19.995 mL
Good one.
 
  • #7
Bystander said:
Good one.

Thank you for your helpful guidance.
 
  • #8
Thanks
 

Related to Creating Different Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide

1. What is dilution of hydrogen peroxide?

Dilution of hydrogen peroxide refers to the process of reducing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in a solution by adding a solvent, such as water.

2. Why is dilution of hydrogen peroxide necessary?

Dilution of hydrogen peroxide is necessary because high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can be dangerous and corrosive. Dilution reduces the concentration to a safer level for handling and use.

3. How is dilution of hydrogen peroxide performed?

Dilution of hydrogen peroxide is typically performed by measuring out a specific amount of the concentrated solution and adding it to a larger volume of solvent, usually water, until the desired concentration is achieved.

4. What are the common uses of diluted hydrogen peroxide?

Diluted hydrogen peroxide is commonly used as a disinfectant, antiseptic, and bleaching agent. It is also used in various industrial processes, such as paper and textile bleaching.

5. Is there a specific ratio for diluting hydrogen peroxide?

The ratio for diluting hydrogen peroxide can vary depending on the desired concentration. In general, a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution can be achieved by diluting one part of 35% hydrogen peroxide with 11 parts of water.

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