Cylinder balancing in a single plane and in two planes

In summary, the conversation discusses the effect of the hollowness of a cylinder on its balancing process. It is stated that there are two types of balancing, static and dynamic, and the hollowness is not considered in the current guidelines. The equation for inertial force and torque is mentioned, along with the acceptable maximum mass imbalance for each quality grade. It is concluded that the hollowness of a rod-like axle does not significantly affect its balancing process.
  • #1
crinoid
1
0
Homework Statement
Hollow cylinder balancing
Relevant Equations
F=m·r·(ang_v)^2
T=F·l
Homework Statement: Hollow cylinder balancing
Homework Equations: F=m·r·(ang_v)^2
T=F·l

Hi, I want to know how the hollowness of a cylinder would affect its balancing process.
A little introduction: There are 2 different types of balancing: in a single plane (static balance) and in 2 planes (dynamic balance). The first one is intended for disk-like objects and the second one is for rod-like ones (the axis dimension, L, is not negligible in relation to the diameter D).
I have a guideline stating the type of balancing process needed according to the L/D ratio and the angular velocity [rpm]. The problem is that the guideline is intended for "filled" cylinders, not hollow ones.
Do you think that the hollowness would make the cylinder more disk-like or do you think I does not affect? What I've tried so far:
Inertial force: F=m·r·(ang_v)^2 --- m: unbalance mass; r: radius (mass imbalance, U=m·r)
Torque: T=F·l; --- l: distance between the forces
Force in each support: Fs=F·(l/h) --- h: distance between supports
In the worst case scenario: Fs=U*ang_v^2*L/h
According to ISO 1940/1, there is an acceptable maximum mass imbalance for each kind of machine, defined by each quality grade G: G[mm/s]=U·ang_v/m_rotor, so U<G·m_rotor/ang_v
I don't know how could I relate this to the shape of the rotor

Thanks in advance
Adrián

Ps: Sorry for my English, it's not my native tongue
 

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  • #2
crinoid said:
I don't know how could I relate this to the shape of the rotor
Since the case you are interested in is a rod-like axle, it isn't going to make much difference whether it is hollow or solid.
However, I do not know how the expression for G is arrived at.
 

Related to Cylinder balancing in a single plane and in two planes

1. What is cylinder balancing in a single plane?

Cylinder balancing in a single plane is the process of equalizing the weight distribution of the pistons and connecting rods in a single row of cylinders in an engine. This is typically done by adding or removing small weights on the connecting rods to ensure that the weight is evenly distributed and the engine runs smoothly.

2. How is cylinder balancing in a single plane done?

Cylinder balancing in a single plane is done by using specialized equipment such as a dynamic engine balancer. This machine measures the imbalance of the engine and calculates the amount of weight needed to balance it. The weights are then added or removed from the connecting rods until the engine is properly balanced.

3. What is the purpose of cylinder balancing in a single plane?

The purpose of cylinder balancing in a single plane is to improve engine performance and reduce vibrations. When the weight is evenly distributed, the engine can run more smoothly and efficiently, resulting in better fuel economy and increased power. It also helps to reduce wear and tear on engine components, prolonging their lifespan.

4. What is cylinder balancing in two planes?

Cylinder balancing in two planes is similar to single plane balancing, but it takes into account the weight distribution of the pistons and connecting rods in two rows of cylinders. This is typically done on V-shaped or boxer engines, where the cylinders are arranged in two separate rows.

5. Is cylinder balancing in two planes necessary?

Cylinder balancing in two planes is not always necessary, but it can help improve engine balance and performance in certain types of engines. It is especially important in high-performance engines, where even small imbalances can lead to significant issues. If you notice excessive vibrations or uneven engine performance, it may be worth considering getting your engine balanced in two planes.

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