Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Demise of TI and the Rise of Desmos

  1. May 9, 2017 #1

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

  2. jcsd
  3. May 10, 2017 #2

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I don't like the use of the word "finally" in the title.
     
  4. May 10, 2017 #3

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    So what are they going to do, let every student use their phone? What could possibly go wrong?
    Have a special device that can only access the online calculator tool? That costs money.
     
  5. May 10, 2017 #4
    Teaching mathematics with a fancy calculator results in idiocracy. The teacher does no work and the students do no work, learning nothing; everybody is happy.
     
  6. May 10, 2017 #5

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Did you learn or teach with a graphical calculator or where does that opinion come from?

    At least in Germany, the same things that have been done without the calculator are still done - without the calculator. In addition, the calculator is used for some problems where calculating integrals or derivatives is not the point of the question.
     
  7. May 12, 2017 #6
    I have to admit that I learned and taught math before the advent of fancy calculators (I'm an old man). When I was a student of, say algebra, I took pencil to paper and solved numerous equations. This developed my intuition for algebraic problems. The same held true for trig and calculus. This intuition I developed through putting pencil to paper, having to physically expand each step of the calculation, served me well in my undergraduate and graduate training in physics. It's the way people have learned math for over a thousand years and it's worked pretty well so far. My point is that by short circuiting the steps of a calculation with a fancy calculator you induce blindness for mathematical comprehension and intuition. But as I said, I'm old; "kids these days!"
     
  8. May 12, 2017 #7

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Don't discount the advantages of having a calculator. Especially a graphing calculator. You can quickly look at how functions behave when you change variables, compare different functions, and many other things that are tedious and error-prone when doing them by hand. They relieve you of much of the "manual labor" when it comes to calculations, freeing you to focus on comprehending the problem instead of worrying about whether your long division was correct or if you remembered what sin(π/3) was correctly.
     
  9. May 12, 2017 #8

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    That is still done! At least in Germany.

    What is done with graphical calculators is something in addition. It doesn't replace the pen and paper calculations.
     
  10. May 15, 2017 #9
    “We think students shouldn’t have to buy this old, underpowered device anymore,” Desmos CEO Eli Luberoff tells Quartz. “It’s a huge source of inequity, and it’s just not the best way to learn.”

    So instead of a calculator for a college algebra class, you'll be required to have a smartphone?
     
  11. May 15, 2017 #10

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Thread reopened following some pruning.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2017
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Demise of TI and the Rise of Desmos
  1. Graphing with ti 89 (Replies: 5)

Loading...