Determining the amount of Silica in Water

  • Thread starter nkk2008
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Water
In summary, the conversation discusses the need for a procedure to analyze the concentration of silica in a solution. The individual has researched online but has not found a suitable procedure, except for one that costs $38. They also mention the possibility of using the molybdenum blue method, which may be available for free at a local college library. Another suggestion is to use the density of silica and water to determine the concentration. However, this method may not be specific for silica. The conversation ends with a suggestion to search for 'molybdenum blue' and 'silica' for further reading.
  • #1
nkk2008
33
0
I need to create a procedure for doing what the title says. I have researched online, but have not found any way (I did find one pre-made procedure, but it cost $38).

I am at a loss, given the relative inertness of silica and the fact that it is a colorless solution.

Does anyone have any suggestions? Or pointers?

Thanks,
Nkk

Also, I did not consider this a homework question, but if the mods feel it is too homework-ish, then my apologies.
 
Last edited:
Chemistry news on Phys.org
  • #2
There is a molybdenum blue method. You may have to pay for it online. It's probably free at the local college library.
 
  • #3
If your solution has only silica and water in it (ie no salts or other non-volatiles) you could simply weigh out a certain amount of your solution (in a preweighed container - preferably ceramic) and put it in the oven at over 250 C or so until it is completely dry then weigh what you have left...the silica will not evaporate off.

Cheers,

FM
 
  • #4
I'm not sure this meets your requirements, but it seems to me that if you know the densities of silica and water you should be able to figure out the concentration of a solution to a reasonable precision with a cylinder, a scale, and a calculator.
 
  • #5
That method would not be specific for silica. It is a rare thing to analyze a pure solution of silica and water.
 
  • #6
chemisttree said:
That method would not be specific for silica. It is a rare thing to analyze a pure solution of silica and water.
Interesting. Any suggestions for further reading? Google terms other than "aqueous silica solution"?
 
  • #7
How about 'molybdenum blue' and 'silica'?
 

Related to Determining the amount of Silica in Water

1. How is the amount of silica in water determined?

The amount of silica in water is typically determined through a process called colorimetry. This involves using a colorimetric reagent that reacts with silica to form a colored compound, which can be measured using a spectrophotometer. The intensity of the color is directly proportional to the amount of silica present in the water.

2. What is the acceptable level of silica in drinking water?

The acceptable level of silica in drinking water varies depending on the country or region. In the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a maximum contaminant level of 100 parts per million (ppm) for silica in drinking water. However, some countries have stricter guidelines, with levels as low as 10 ppm.

3. What are the potential health risks associated with high levels of silica in water?

High levels of silica in water can have both short-term and long-term health effects. Short-term exposure to high levels of silica can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory system. Long-term exposure can lead to the development of silicosis, a serious lung disease. Silica has also been linked to an increased risk of kidney disease.

4. What are the sources of silica in water?

Silica can be naturally present in water sources, such as rivers and lakes. It can also come from industrial activities, such as mining and manufacturing, or from the use of certain products like pesticides or fertilizers. Additionally, the use of certain water treatment processes, such as reverse osmosis, can increase the level of silica in water.

5. How can the level of silica in water be reduced?

There are several methods for reducing the level of silica in water. One approach is through the use of water treatment processes, such as ion exchange or reverse osmosis, which can remove silica from the water. Another method is to use silica-specific adsorbents, which can selectively remove silica. Additionally, implementing best management practices in industrial activities can help reduce the amount of silica entering water sources.

Similar threads

Replies
16
Views
2K
  • Chemistry
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
989
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • General Engineering
Replies
19
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Earth Sciences
Replies
20
Views
6K
Back
Top