Did Wheeler consider Carter's anthropic multiverse?

In summary, physicist John Wheeler discussed the idea of the "genesis of observership" in his article "Genesis and Observership." He considered the possibility of multiple universes existing simultaneously, as proposed by Carter, but also expressed dislike for the idea of multiple universes, as stated by David Deutsch in his book "The Fabric of Reality." It seems that Wheeler rejected the Many Worlds Interpretation but may have accepted the Anthropic Multiverse. However, since Wheeler is no longer alive, this discussion cannot be resolved.
  • #1
Suekdccia
253
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TL;DR Summary
Did Wheeler accept Carter's anthropic principle-based multiverse?
Physicist John Wheeler wrote an article called "Genesis and Observership" where he said near the end:

"We have reviewed the evidence out of the big bang tat the universe did come into being and the evidence that not only space but all the structures and laws of physics are mutable. In the domain in which each law is applicable that law states itself most compactly as the consequence of a symmetry; but that symmetry hides any view of the next layer of structure. Not the slightest hint presents itself of any 'ultimate' layer of structure either of mathematics or physics. One is led to ask whether the interconnections between one level of structure and the next, rather than continuing forever, do not close up full circle on the observer himself. Nothing speaks more strongly for this thesis than the anthropic principle of Carter and Dicke and the indispensable place of the participating observer-as evidenced in quantum mechanics-in defining any useful concept of reality. No way is evident to bring these considerations together into a larger unity except through the thesis of 'genesis of observership'"

Does this mean that Wheeler considered that there was a ensemble of universes, all existing simultaneously, as Carter postulated?

If yes, how can this be compatible with the fact that Wheeler did not like the idea of having multiple universes existing at once, which he expressed in various times?

"Hugh Everett, then a Princeton graduate student working under the eminent physicist John Archibald Wheeler, first set out the many-universes implications of quantum theory. Wheeler did not accept them. He was (and still is) convinced that Bohr’s vision, though incomplete, was the basis of the correct explanation"

(From David Deutsch's "The fabric of Reality")

So what did Wheeler think? Did he reject the Many Worlds Interpretation but accepted Carter's Anthropic Multiverse?
 
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  • #2
Suekdccia said:
So what did Wheeler think?

Since Wheeler is no longer around to be asked for clarification, I don't see how this question can possibly be resolved by discussion.

Thread closed.
 

1. What is Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory?

Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory states that there are an infinite number of parallel universes, each with different physical laws and constants. This theory suggests that the universe we live in is just one of many possible universes, and the laws and constants in our universe are finely tuned to allow for life to exist.

2. Did Wheeler believe in the existence of a multiverse?

Yes, Wheeler was a proponent of the multiverse theory. He believed that the idea of a single, unique universe was limiting and that the concept of a multiverse allowed for a greater understanding of the universe and its origins.

3. Did Wheeler consider Carter's anthropic principle in his multiverse theory?

Yes, Wheeler incorporated Carter's anthropic principle into his multiverse theory. This principle states that the universe must be compatible with the existence of observers, and the observed values of physical constants must allow for the existence of life.

4. What evidence supports Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory?

There is currently no direct evidence for Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory. However, the theory is supported by the fact that the physical laws and constants in our universe appear to be finely tuned for life to exist. Additionally, some theories in quantum mechanics and string theory suggest the possibility of a multiverse.

5. How does Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory differ from other multiverse theories?

Wheeler's anthropic multiverse theory is unique in that it incorporates the anthropic principle, which suggests that the universe must be compatible with the existence of observers. Other multiverse theories may focus on different aspects, such as the inflationary multiverse or the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

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