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Dielectric Strength Of Liquids: looking for data

  1. Aug 5, 2009 #1
    Hello all of you!

    I'm looking for reliable data about the dielectric strength (=breakdown field) of liquid insulators with a high permittivity and a low viscosity and not too dangerous.

    Examples of such liquids:
    - Ethylene glycol carbonate. Propylene glycol carbonate. Maybe the oxalates and sulphates.
    - Ethanol. Methanol.
    - Small ketones and aldehydes
    - Small phosphates?
    - Furfuraldehyde maybe.

    I couldn't find them in my Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (1990), in Wikipedia, nor on the Web.

    The use would be in an electrostatic alternator which looks very interesting (MW or GW range!), as I describe it there:
    http://saposjoint.cjb.net/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=66&t=1684
    I suggest beginning to read on page 2 with the sketches and diagrams.

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 9, 2009 #2
  4. Aug 10, 2009 #3

    chemisttree

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    Learn to use the index of the handbook! Look under "Dielectric Constant - Liquids" . In the 84th Edition it is in Section 6 pages 155 to 177.
     
  5. Aug 10, 2009 #4
    I already have all permittivities.

    Where do you find the dielectric strength?
     
  6. Aug 11, 2009 #5

    chemisttree

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  7. Aug 14, 2009 #6
    Thank you!
     
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