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Job Skills Differences between Computer engineering and Computer Science?

  1. Nov 7, 2017 #26
    I get it, but how can I know if I'm gonna enjoy studying computer engineering ?
     
  2. Nov 7, 2017 #27

    donpacino

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    analog hardware
    digital hardware
    driver software
    high level algorithms


    which of those above four things interest you
     
  3. Nov 7, 2017 #28
    I never worked in this field, I never thought that there are still people that work on analog hardware.
    Anyway probably I would choose driver software and high level algorithms.
     
  4. Nov 7, 2017 #29

    donpacino

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    We live in an analog world!!

    computer engineering primarily covers digital hardware and driver software, with opportunities for high level algorithms
    computer science primarily covers high level algorithms and software

    If you arent interested in hardware at all, computer science would be a better bet
     
  5. Nov 7, 2017 #30

    fresh_42

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    I'm pretty sure, that this isn't a the only job they have. I worked with someone who studied philosophy and managed the company's network.
    Well, if you're open to it, they do. However, in case people haven't built some social competences already, they probably can't.
    This was just an example. You may replace it by
    if you like. I've seen a server park that was run by some students aside their study. Companies like, e.g. Google have their own employees for that, and I doubt that they all studied something with computer in its name.
    I want to say was exactly this:
    You must not think in these close relations ##\{degree\} \longleftrightarrow \{person\} \longleftrightarrow \{role\}##.
    They are not bijections. A person has a degree, which is a property, and has a role for the time being on a project. This can last a lifetime, but more often it does not. The property degree is a characteristic as height or hair color is. The property role changes on demand and opportunity. The fact that someone achieved a degree already says something about this person regardless in which field he got the degree.
     
  6. Nov 9, 2017 #31
    I can assure you that in Italy they won't find a work as a manager, at least the have to duty to speak and help people that work in the company and need motivational support.

    I get it, but when a people search a Job, doesn't search it by indicating which is his bachelor's degree, maybe in the US the degree is just a little part of the CV.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2017 #32

    fresh_42

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    Nobody becomes a manager right away from university. It's the time in between, which counts. I'd suggest to wait another 30 years, before you assure things like that.
     
  8. Nov 9, 2017 #33
    I know people that get a degree in philosophy and after, because they didn't have job opportunities, they get another major in stuff like Pharmacy.
     
  9. Nov 11, 2017 #34
    Hi guys, I don't want to be boring, but I still don't understand if Computer engineering is the right degree for me, and i don't know what to do to understand this, due to the fact that I've never code and I never worked on electronics architectures.

    Are things that I can learn from college, but to I need to know if this is the carrier I desire most, or the work that I would like to do, to be motivated to choose this major.

    Thanks.
     
  10. Nov 11, 2017 #35
    Computer engineering is half computer science and half electrical engineering. If nothing in electrical engineering interests you, choose computer science.
     
  11. Nov 12, 2017 #36
    I don't know if I want "only" code all my life.
    In this period I'm impressed by what AI can do, especially in the medical fields, there are robots that can make diagnosis in less then 1 minutes, comparing thousands of clinical cases.
    I like also stuff like self-driving car.
    Baby for this kind of job is better a major in CE.

    What do you think?
     
  12. Nov 12, 2017 #37

    donpacino

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    Ok lets look at the self driving car, because I've done some work with that, both professionally and academically. I was also 6 credits short of being both an EE and CPE (im an EE). Professionally I've acted as both an electrical and computer engineer. Remember that computer engineering is really just a subset of both electrical engineering and computer science.

    At a generic level)
    controls engineers (EE or ME usually) would design the control laws for simulating how the car would move. They would also work with sensor fusion engineers, which is a combo of controls, signal processing, and electrical (EE, CPE and CS usually ). They would work with the software team to actually implement their algorithm on a real computing system so it will work outside of simulations (CS, CPE, and some EE). In parallel engineers would design the physical hardware necessary to make the system work (EE and ME). They would also design the electrical hardware to make it work (EE and CPE).

    That's just R&D. There is another level for production, which is just as diverse. My team at grad school had 2 MEs, 1 EE, and 1 CS major.

    I know people that majored in electrical engineering that are now pure software guys. I know people that majored in software that work on hardware.
    You need to accept the fact that you don't have any idea at this point what engineering is or if you will even like it. Pick something you think you'll like and dive in. worse case you switch majors. EE, CPE, and CS are all close enough that the skills you will develop will compliment the other majors.

    You say you don't know if you only want to code, but have you ever actually wrote code? Have you ever actually worked on hardware?
     
  13. Nov 13, 2017 #38
    Behind such a great technology there is always a team?

    I know that this is possible, but my preoccupation is about not having the necessary skills, I mean, if I get a CE major, how can I compete with a CS?
    He will know more then me about how to code.
    The same with a electronic engineering, he will know better then me how to creare hardware architecture.

    I never worked on hardware, because I don't know where to start, I don't thing I have the necessary tools.
    I just tried to code on my self, because we don't have computer science courses at schools, so I use my pc.
     
  14. Nov 14, 2017 #39
    There are skills that only a computer engineers has?
    There are law that says that only computer engineers can do "something", like only civil engineers can build houses ?

    Thanks.
     
  15. Nov 15, 2017 #40
    Hi guys, due to the fact that CE is a very new field, does exist the risk of being overqualiticated in a great part of job offers?
    I mean, if a company look for someone that is a physicist or a mathematician, or a computer engineering for the same job, there isn't the risk of doing something that requires only a bachelor's degree and few advances skills?

    Can this slow down the carrier of a CE?

    Thanks.
     
  16. Nov 15, 2017 #41
    P.S. I also heard that master degree in CS is not very useful because it only teach new languages that are not very requested and that can also be learned by ourself, it is true?
     
  17. Nov 15, 2017 #42

    Mark44

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    If a mechanic told you he needed to grind your head gasket, my advice is to find a new mechanic. :oldsurprised:

    As already said by another member, people generally don't get managerial jobs right out of college. If a person studied philosophy, and had a skill that the company needed, he or she might be hired by that company in some position. After a few years, that person might be promoted to a manager position.
    I don't think I put much faith when you tell us "I can assure you ..." From your other posts, I take it that you are still in high school or possibly just starting university, and have never held a full-time job. So I don't think you have the experience to tell us how things work in the corporate world.

    Maybe true in Italy, but much less so in other countries. I worked in the software industry for 15 years. Having an advanced degree (either master's or PhD) in CS would be a plus in hiring.
     
  18. Nov 15, 2017 #43

    symbolipoint

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    Grands, One may guess that you are interested in Computer Science.
     
  19. Nov 15, 2017 #44

    symbolipoint

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    Grand, I believe you are interested in Computer Science.
    I knew someone who earned an undergraduate degree in Philosophy and also something like Masters degree in Mathematics and was a high school Mathematics teacher.
     
  20. Nov 15, 2017 #45
    This is something good to hear.

    Why?
     
  21. Nov 15, 2017 #46

    Mark44

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    Based on your preferences to @donpacino's post #27; namely driver software and high-level algorithms.
     
  22. Nov 15, 2017 #47
    I said this because all argument I tried to learn on my own, how can I say if i like hardware if I never tried to work on?
     
  23. Nov 15, 2017 #48

    symbolipoint

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    Grand, I gave some quotes that I used for making my suggestion. I am trying to help.
     
  24. Nov 16, 2017 #49
    I have another question.
    Is Computer Engineering orientated more on the industrial side then Computer Science?
    Are computer engineers involved more in the industrial manufacturing then computer scientists ?
     
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