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Do gamma and X-ray wavelength photons also exist as collapse able wave fx's?

  1. Feb 7, 2012 #1
    This question has gone unanswered by our friends in nuclear/atomic threads.

    My question relates to a solitary Tc^99m decay in particular, and to gamma rays in general. If light is a collapse able wave function, are different wavelength energies the same, ie gamma, x, radio, etc.

    My suspicion is yes. Does this mean that a gamma photon detected from a far away galaxy is in fact the collapse of an ever expanding wave function?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2012 #2
    Light is essentially the same thing as x-ray or gamma radiation at a lower energy, yes. But I don't think it has a "wavefunction" in any ordinary sense. The reason for this is that you can create and destroy billions of photons as easily as switching on and off a light bulb, so there's no conserved probability density for any individual photon. Instead, you have to think about a photon as the quantum of the electromagnetic field.
     
  4. Feb 7, 2012 #3
    Photons are not destroyed by turning off a light, they are just no longer created. The emitted photons travel onward until acting upon something, no?
     
  5. Feb 7, 2012 #4
    >there's no conserved probability density for any individual photon.

    This is helpful, thank you

    >Instead, you have to think about a photon as the quantum of the electromagnetic field.
     
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