Do I have a chance to get into top physics programs?

In summary, your chances of getting into a top-ranked university like Princeton or Stanford are decent, but you may have a better chance at a lower ranked university.
  • #1
Supercondcutor
3
0
Hi,
I know such questions have been asked several times in this forum, but it would be a nice guide for me to choose where to apply.

I am an Electronics Engineering bachelor student from a university in the middle east that does not have a physics program (and physics programs in my country are bad anyway). However, I have two REU's in theoretical physics in Germany (with one presentation and poster), I'm the top of my class (about 500 students) with an A+ in all courses, I have excellent recommendations, I have won several regional contests in math, programming and chemistry, I had several math and physics extracurricular courses and I had a 990 in the physics GRE.

I know that the fact that my undergraduate major is not physics will make the admission committee not sure about my physics background and will be a big minus but I want to ask if
I have a reasonable chance to get into places like Princeton or Stanford, or should I try lower ranked universitirs?
 
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  • #2
I'm not really qualified to comment, but I got to think you have a decent chance.
 
  • #3
where are you right now? it'll make a difference
 
  • #4
ice109 said:
where are you right now? it'll make a difference

I am in my final year at my university in Egypt (probably not a known university in the US)
 
  • #5
No matter what you think your chances are, apply to both. Apply to a lot of schools. Pick a few that you really want to go to but may not get into. Pick a bunch that you'd like to go to and you think you have a good chance at, and pick a few that you're confident you can get into.

Also, it depends on what kind of physics you plan to study.

Hope this helps.
 
  • #6
evenkolder said:
Also, it depends on what kind of physics you plan to study.

Well, I am planning to study theoretical condensed matter physics
 

Related to Do I have a chance to get into top physics programs?

1. What GPA do I need to have to get into top physics programs?

The minimum GPA required for top physics programs varies, but generally a GPA of at least 3.5 is recommended. However, having a high GPA alone is not enough to guarantee admission. Admissions committees also consider other factors such as research experience, letters of recommendation, and challenging coursework.

2. Is it necessary to have research experience to get into top physics programs?

Research experience is highly valued by top physics programs, but it is not always necessary. If you have a strong academic background and can demonstrate your interest and potential in physics through other means, such as independent projects or internships, it can still increase your chances of admission.

3. Do I need to have a specific major to get into top physics programs?

While a major in physics or a related field is preferred, it is not always required. Admissions committees also consider applicants from other majors such as engineering, mathematics, or computer science, as long as they have taken relevant physics courses and can demonstrate a strong foundation in the subject.

4. How important are letters of recommendation for top physics programs?

Letters of recommendation can play a significant role in the admissions process for top physics programs. It is important to choose recommenders who can speak to your academic abilities, research experience, and personal qualities that make you a strong candidate for graduate study in physics.

5. What can I do to improve my chances of getting into top physics programs?

In addition to having a strong academic background and relevant research experience, you can improve your chances of getting into top physics programs by taking challenging coursework, participating in extracurricular activities related to physics, and preparing a well-written personal statement that showcases your passion for the subject and your potential as a researcher.

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