Do I have choice what resolution to stream using boxes like Roku?

In summary, Alan is considering whether or not to upgrade to a 4K TV and whether or not to use a streaming device with a limited bandwidth connection. He is also considering whether or not to trade in his old TVs for newer models with a lower resolution. He is considering whether or not to use a streaming device with a lower data cap or to have satellite internet.
  • #1
yungman
5,726
242
Hi

Sorry about the stupid question. I am completely green on tv streaming. I have a limitation of 25MBPS internet connection. I know 4K video needs 25MBPS speed. That is I can ONLY run one tv.

I really don't care about the clarity and resolution. I have modern smart tv, but I am still feeding with RCA composite video. I am a sound guy, my stereo is tip top, but I don't care about the screen.

Can I make a choice what resolution video to stream? That is can I just want to stream SD or at best HD videos so I can use multiple tv, computers with just 25MBPS internet connection.

Thanks

Alan
 
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  • #2
Netflix I believe automatically adjusts resolution down if you are having bandwidth problems.

Of course, another solution is to trade in the 4K TVs for a HD, or even less than HD.
 
  • #3
What will happen if I have 4 TV station watching 4 different channels at the same time with max internet download speed of 25MBPS only?

This article said I can set the speed of Roku, would that solve my problem if I set Roku to 8MBPS so even if I run 4 tv, it's still using 24MBPS. Am I reading this right?
https://www.technipages.com/roku-set-connection-speed
Also this article said I can set the video quality to reduce buffering:
https://www.lifewire.com/fix-roku-keeps-buffering-5208692

What is BUFFERING? Does it mean screen freeze while trying to downloading?

Will the screen freeze if the download speed of the internet is too slow?
 
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  • #4
It sounds to me as though you are taking the advertised maximum internet speed of 25 MBPS for granted. I would be very surprised if you could count on getting the advertised speed. You should run some speed tests before you do too much planning.
 
  • #5
I did more reading. For satellite internet, there is a very low data cap. Like Hughesnet, cheaper one only has 15GB. Which is very low for streaming tv. Even the more expensive has limit of 100GB.

I think now I understand why people still using DirecTV and other cable TV while streaming devices are much cheaper. Looks like it's cheaper to go to say Xfinity tv, then just keep the basic satellite internet provider for emergency. If any storm or earthquake cut off the cable tv, I can just pull out antenna to get on air local tv to watch live shows. With this arrangement, cost would be like $90 for tv, $70 for satellite internet, total of $160/mo. That is still cheaper than getting an expensive satellite internet.

Any other suggestions are welcome.

Thanks

Alan
 
  • #6

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