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Do properties associated with photons also apply to other bosons?

  1. Jan 23, 2013 #1
    A photon has an energy correleated with its frequency. Photons can interfere.
    Can the same be said for other bosons, like the Higgs?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 23, 2013 #2

    DrDu

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    A frequency may be ascribed to any particle, not just photons and any particle may interfere with itself.
    What is peculiar about the photon is that it carries no charge and therefore it is possible to have superpositions of states containing different number of photons. Then the fields themselves become observables.
    Higgs bosons are also not charged, so should behave similar to photons in that respect (however they are massive).
     
  4. Jan 23, 2013 #3
    I'm not sure why this is the case - why I cannot have bunch of W+ bosons (or electrons) with uncertain number of particles, such as the eigenstate of annihilation operator. Is it because that would mean uncertain total charge, while charge must be conserved? But energy must also be conserved and there are states with uncertain energy (non-stationary states).

    Or is it because like charges repel? But globally the net charge is zero in a charged field.
     
  5. Jan 23, 2013 #4

    DrDu

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    This is called charge superselection which prohibits superpositions of states with different charge. Likewise you may view it as a consequence of the global unitary transformations possible for charged fields. These will average out all non-diagonal terms in superpositions of different charge.
     
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