Do you like or dislike reading e-books?

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I think you're getting far ahead of yourself here. AR glasses have been talked about for decades and whilst we have continued to develop technology towards them there is still no confirmed product on the horizon, let alone one with all the abilities that you have proposed. I admit though that I am looking forward to the day where I can wear glasses that are also my general purpose casual computer and phone (so long as the interface is intuitive and well designed).
Virtual reality headsets suffer from vertigo problems and ten years ago the entire semiconductor industry encountered a series of setbacks starting with problems in single core computing. However, they've not been idly sitting on their hands and within the next two years we'll see a convergence of technologies usher in the next computer revolution that will make all our current devices and computers antiquated. Interposers, chip stacking, OLEDs, memristors, transactional memory, and on and on. Manufacturing specific gadgets like AR glasses depends as much on the available supply chain as anything else, but my guess is within five years we should see the first popular models come on the market. Suffice it to say I don't believe for a moment that Google is researching interfaces for such devices believing they are ten or twenty years down the road.

However I fail to see why AR glasses would necessarily kill off e-readers. Reason being that e-readers are static e-paper displays that are far easier on the eyes to read. This is why tablets, smartphones and computers aren't totally competing with things like kindles. A personal complication on top of that is that I require glasses to read screens without getting headaches, if my glasses are a screen how will this be achieved? Obviously this doesn't apply to everyone but the number of people requiring glasses to read and read screens is a sizable portion of the demographic.
E-readers will survive, but in a niche market. Already e-readers are being developed that can be incorporated into a flexible piece of plastic or even paper and are full color and fast enough to display video. At the same time OLEDs can also be printed on something as simple as paper and double as room lighting and solar cells! You could literally wallpaper your house with them. Where it will all end is anyone's guess, but you can count on being bombarded everywhere you go with billboards and video. Eventually you may need to wear AR glasses just to help screen out the constant bombardment from advertisers.

Why do you think this? What evidence have you for information being possible to "inject whole hog"? Furthermore any device that shocks the brain to improve study rime is bunk, research in recent years has shown that very specific and direct stimulation of mouse hypocampi improves learning puzzles. The idea that someone has done it in humans and marketed it seems dubious at best.
DARPA and Oxford University are the most reputable and the latest I know of to claim positive results:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-04-darpa-electrical-brain-aid.html

You're welcome to argue with them over whether it's bunk or not, but I don't recommend arguing with DARPA. Likewise, its easy enough to build your own such devices and I've seen one commercial device advertised but, again, I'm not recommending them even though they are the equivalent of 9v battery. Merely pointing out the possibilities.

Similarly, injecting information whole hog is all but pure science fiction at this point as I alluded to. However, false memories have been implanted into mice:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2119262/Inception-reality-Scientists-implant-false-memories-mice.html
 
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Everything electronic is in a constant state of change. What we have right now will go the way of the eight track. I have print books that are centuries old and still readable.

I prefer to read a traditional book. In an emergency I can even cut strips from around the border and use them to start a fire.:wink:
 

Ryan_m_b

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
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DARPA and Oxford University are the most reputable and the latest I know of to claim positive results:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-04-darpa-electrical-brain-aid.html

You're welcome to argue with them over whether it's bunk or not, but I don't recommend arguing with DARPA. Likewise, its easy enough to build your own such devices and I've seen one commercial device advertised but, again, I'm not recommending them even though they are the equivalent of 9v battery. Merely pointing out the possibilities.
Regardless that I missed this development I highly doubt the commercial products have any validity. I'll believe it when I see some peer-reviewed research from a credible source showing the validity of the product.
Similarly, injecting information whole hog is all but pure science fiction at this point as I alluded to. However, false memories have been implanted into mice:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2119262/Inception-reality-Scientists-implant-false-memories-mice.html
Are you from the UK? If not you may not realise that the Daily Fail is a notoriously bad paper, especially for science. Furthermore the article does not explain what is really going on in the study.
 
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Regardless that I missed this development I highly doubt the commercial products have any validity. I'll believe it when I see some peer-reviewed research from a credible source showing the validity of the product.

Are you from the UK? If not you may not realise that the Daily Fail is a notoriously bad paper, especially for science. Furthermore the article does not explain what is really going on in the study.
I'm American. That article on synthetic memories was just the first one that popped up in a Google search. Here's the original one I read:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120322161251.htm

For the umteenth time, I am not recommending people zap their brains or suggesting implanting memories whole hog into someone's head is going to happen anytime soon. Some people have no sense of humor.
 

Ryan_m_b

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
5,754
706
I'm American. That article on synthetic memories was just the first one that popped up in a Google search. Here's the original one I read:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120322161251.htm
Thank you for the article, I look forward to reading it.
For the umteenth time, I am not recommending people zap their brains or suggesting implanting memories whole hog into someone's head is going to happen anytime soon. Some people have no sense of humor.
That's a bit harsh. I have a sense of humour but didn't pick up on humour at all in your posts. Apologies for any aggravation.
 

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