Do You Use The F Word In Real Life?

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SpringCreek
Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

For most of my life I didn't curse and was offended when other people did. But then...

Several years ago I lost my job in a professional office setting and had to take a job in a blue collar setting. I was shocked at the language at first, but eventually I understood it to be a sort of local dialect. It took a while but now I can use that dialect at will when I'm around people of that sort. In other settings I use whatever the context appropriate language happens to be.

I have found that if I want to have a meeting of the minds with someone, especially a stranger, it's efficacious to speak their language.

Let me just add this: The 'F' word typically is an expression of anger. It has evolved somewhat, but mostly it's still about anger. I learned that the reason blue collar workers use the word so much has little to do with their education level. It's used because they have so much in life to be angry about, especially on the job.

These are just generalizations, of course.
 
848
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I swear quite a bit in real life. I tend to be quick to anger (think Ari Gold from Entourage).
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

When I said you wouldn't believe the complaints we get, I meant we get members reported for saying *damn* or *damn it*, or using God's name in vain, etc... not something most people would find offending.
It does actually make sense for religious people to be offended by these words. It's actually much easier to make a biblical argument against words like that than it is for words like f***, s***, and the like. I know a number of Christians who are far more offended by a "God damn it!" or a "Jesus Christ!" than an f-bomb. It's because the usage of words like that as curse words is pretty much directly forbidden in the Bible, whereas the arguments against other swear words tend to be a lot weaker from a religious moral standpoint (often, at heart, the arguments basically come down to the fact that it's Church tradition to avoid such words).
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

A recent post by Evo warning about bad language in an article:



I think an English teacher I had pinpointed the biggest problem with the "F" word: those who use it tend to extend it into a multipurpose word that fills all conversational needs. It becomes all pervasive. Some people I know can't get through a sentence without fitting it in three times. In the end they become inarticulate.

For that reason I support banning it in certain situations, especially academic ones.

That said, I use it a fair amount myself in real life. Having long ago mastered being able to avoid it where prohibited, I find it to be very effective sometimes.

How about you?
I usually use it in traffic, if I get hurt by something, or if I bite the inside of my lip by accident.
 
Ryan_m_b
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

It does actually make sense for religious people to be offended by these words. It's actually much easier to make a biblical argument against words like that than it is for words like f***, s***, and the like. I know a number of Christians who are far more offended by a "God damn it!" or a "Jesus Christ!" than an f-bomb. It's because the usage of words like that as curse words is pretty much directly forbidden in the Bible, whereas the arguments against other swear words tend to be a lot weaker from a religious moral standpoint (often, at heart, the arguments basically come down to the fact that it's Church tradition to avoid such words).
Where is the use of curse words banned in the Bible? Considering it was written in a language with a different set up to English.

As a philosophy lecturer explained to me some time ago even using the "lords name in vain" does not refer to using it as an expletive, it refers to claiming God is responsible for your successes.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Where is the use of curse words banned in the Bible? Considering it was written in a language with a different set up to English.

As a philosophy lecturer explained to me some time ago even using the "lords name in vain" does not refer to using it as an expletive, it refers to claiming God is responsible for your successes.
I never said that the use of curse words in general is banned in the Bible...

By the way, just because someone says "if you read the original language" doesn't mean they're right (doesn't mean they're wrong either, of course). The people who translated into English read the original language, did they not? (and a lot of other people have too) What makes your philosophy prof's interpretation automatically correct, compared with other people who have made interpretations from the original text? (I'm not saying it's incorrect, or even that I disagree with it, I just see no reason from your post to take it as correct) Now, I don't think there's really a way to continue this discussion much beyond that without breaking forum rules (which is my reasoning for so conveniently ignoring the actual argument). Regardless, I think it's clear that the purpose of this thread is not to determine whether or not swearing is condemned in the Bible and, if so, what specifically is condemned. I was simply saying that a lot of people do have reason to feel offended by the words Evo mentioned. Whether they're right or not is an entirely different matter.
 
Ryan_m_b
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I never said that the use of curse words in general is banned in the Bible...

By the way, just because someone says "if you read the original language" doesn't mean they're right (doesn't mean they're wrong either, of course). The people who translated into English read the original language, did they not? (and a lot of other people have too) What makes your philosophy prof's interpretation automatically correct, compared with other people who have made interpretations from the original text? (I'm not saying it's incorrect, or even that I disagree with it, I just see no reason from your post to take it as correct) Now, I don't think there's really a way to continue this discussion much beyond that without breaking forum rules (which is my reasoning for so conveniently ignoring the actual argument). Regardless, I think it's clear that the purpose of this thread is not to determine whether or not swearing is condemned in the Bible and, if so, what specifically is condemned. I was simply saying that a lot of people do have reason to feel offended by the words Evo mentioned. Whether they're right or not is an entirely different matter.
Eh? you're the one that bought it up :rolleyes: onto other things though
 
Ivan Seeking
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Where is the use of curse words banned in the Bible? Considering it was written in a language with a different set up to English.

As a philosophy lecturer explained to me some time ago even using the "lords name in vain" does not refer to using it as an expletive, it refers to claiming God is responsible for your successes.
The problem is the "in vain" part. It has nothing to do with successes. It refers to using these words [God, Lord, Christ] only in the proper context. Also, to "damn" someone is to pass judgement or to wish evil upon another, which is considered sinful. It can all be argued as a matter of context.

For example, to call upon God to damn your car because it won't start is considered irreverant and a violation of the 3rd commandment.
 
Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I say who cares. Sometimes I do, if I'm around a tight a** then I wont.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I was shocked at the language at first, but eventually I understood it to be a sort of local dialect.
Bingo!

Heavy use of the word communicates to others that you're from their neck of the woods, socio-economically speaking. The same dialect might also mean that you are, or have been, in the military. It's the dialect of thick-skinned, calloused people who do dirty, hard jobs. Saying "F***!" doesn't just express anger, it helps you stay angry, which is a poor man's motivator. And it keeps the callouses thick.

Use of the word by people who aren't blue collar, especially teenagers, communicates a whole host of things as well: you're not under the thumb of "the man" and are therefore likely to drink, smoke pot, not be uptight about rules and regulations.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I use it when other words don't suffice.
 
SpringCreek
Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Saying "F***!" doesn't just express anger, it helps you stay angry, which is a poor man's motivator. And it keeps the callouses thick.
That's an excellent point.

Language can also be a shield. While working that blue collar job, I occasionally used profanity deliberately when dealing with in-house white collar 'customers' who had an attitude. I would moderate my tone so as not to sound too threatening. The profanity itself conveyed the message that I couldn't be pushed and it's best not to try.
 
BobG
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Almost never.

About the only exception is "WTF?", which is slightly different in meaning than "WTH?".

But, it's not very common for me to use any curse words, so f- isn't that special.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

It's the dialect of thick-skinned, calloused people who do dirty, hard jobs.
At first, I thought this said "hand jobs". I was appalled!
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

That's an excellent point.

Language can also be a shield. While working that blue collar job, I occasionally used profanity deliberately when dealing with in-house white collar 'customers' who had an attitude. I would moderate my tone so as not to sound too threatening. The profanity itself conveyed the message that I couldn't be pushed and it's best not to try.
Exactly what I meant when I referred to it as "effective" in my OP. The strategic use of it causes a shift in people's perspective of you, and always suggests you are a more aggressive person than they pegged you for.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

It depends on the people I'm around.

In some groups, I probably use it every other sentence. In others I use it only in moderation and when emphasis is needed, in others I wouldn't dare even think of using it.
 
Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Bingo!

Heavy use of the word communicates to others that you're from their neck of the woods, socio-economically speaking. The same dialect might also mean that you are, or have been, in the military. It's the dialect of thick-skinned, calloused people who do dirty, hard jobs. Saying "F***!" doesn't just express anger, it helps you stay angry, which is a poor man's motivator. And it keeps the callouses thick.

Use of the word by people who aren't blue collar, especially teenagers, communicates a whole host of things as well: you're not under the thumb of "the man" and are therefore likely to drink, smoke pot, not be uptight about rules and regulations.
Well said, I never knew cussing was common place in the military. The impression I have gotten is that it is about obedience to authority/hierarchy and being tough--How valid that is I don't really know.

Additionally, I (maybe falsely) have always seen cussing as something that only could have negative results regarding people respecting me and me surviving in the world. After hearing several comments it seems that it can be beneficially used.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Well said, I never knew cussing was common place in the military. The impression I have gotten is that it is about obedience to authority/hierarchy and being tough--How valid that is I don't really know.
Al kinds of profanity is thrown at people in boot camp by drill instructors. The point being to toughen them up emotionally. See the movie Full Metal Jacket. Kubrick used a real drill instructor, R. Lee Ermy, to play the one in the film. Also the movie Jarhead accurately depicts language in the military. I live in San Diego which is crawling with sailors and marines, and they all cuss profusely.

Additionally, I (maybe falsely) have always seen cussing as something that only could have negative results regarding people respecting me and me surviving in the world. After hearing several comments it seems that it can be beneficially used.
I wouldn't phrase it "beneficially used" so much as "strategically used."
 
ideasrule
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Heavy use of the word communicates to others that you're from their neck of the woods, socio-economically speaking. The same dialect might also mean that you are, or have been, in the military. It's the dialect of thick-skinned, calloused people who do dirty, hard jobs. Saying "F***!" doesn't just express anger, it helps you stay angry, which is a poor man's motivator. And it keeps the callouses thick.

Use of the word by people who aren't blue collar, especially teenagers, communicates a whole host of things as well: you're not under the thumb of "the man" and are therefore likely to drink, smoke pot, not be uptight about rules and regulations.
I hope you're joking, or else you're jumping to conclusions without any evidence or reasoning whatsoever. "It helps you stay angry?" "you're not under the thumb of 'the man'"?? Have you considered the possibility that people use the word to vent their own frustration, without making some kind of grandiose statement on society? I use the word all the time with my friends, and my only purpose is to express dissatisfaction. It's not my "dialect", and when I use it because I just spilled acid on myself, it means I'm in pain and would appreciate help. It doesn't mean I want to drink, smoke pot, or not be uptight about rules or regulations.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I use the word in real life. But I'm really not interested in what they has to say about me. I'd rather not be pushed into a group of people using the word, and then have claimed I have such and such traits. Get to know me, don't rely on some research and assume everyone fits under the same umbrella.
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I hope you're joking, or else you're jumping to conclusions without any evidence or reasoning whatsoever. "It helps you stay angry?" "you're not under the thumb of 'the man'"?? Have you considered the possibility that people use the word to vent their own frustration, without making some kind of grandiose statement on society? I use the word all the time with my friends, and my only purpose is to express dissatisfaction. It's not my "dialect", and when I use it because I just spilled acid on myself, it means I'm in pain and would appreciate help. It doesn't mean I want to drink, smoke pot, or not be uptight about rules or regulations.
Wow. Would I be jumping to a conclusion with no evidence or reasoning whatsoever to characterize your reaction to my observations as emotionally charged?

Yes, saying "F***" helps you stay angry, and I characterized that as a "poor man's motivator" in reference to hard, dirty blue collar jobs. It's easier to lift the end of a heavy propeller shaft and mount it on the big lathe, for example, if you're ticked off at its weight and awkwardness than if you're depressed about the job. So, you say to someone "Grab the other end of this Fu**er and help me get it up there."

The kind of language a person uses not only expresses their mood and attitude, it also acts to create it. That's the whole reason behind the recent campaign to discourage the word "retard", for example, with that campaign's reiteration of all the other words it's not acceptable to use. If you call people by a certain term, you start thinking of them that way. Using racial slurs helps create racism: it depersonalizes the object of the slur in the mind of the person using the word.

Likewise, use of the word "f***" doesn't just express anger, it also perpetuates and generates anger.

Yeah, I said "not under the thumb of the man". The F word is prohibited by all kinds of authorities seeking to control the behavior of teenagers where ever teenage behavior needs controlling. To resort to using it as soon as you're out of earshot of authority says you're not under the thumb of "the man", because those who are won't use it even when the authority is absent.

And, yeah, the same kids who resort are also the ones most likely to smoke pot, drink, etc.

Have you considered the possibility that people use the word to vent their own frustration, without making some kind of grandiose statement on society? I use the word all the time with my friends, and my only purpose is to express dissatisfaction. It's not my "dialect", and when I use it because I just spilled acid on myself, it means I'm in pain and would appreciate help. It doesn't mean I want to drink, smoke pot, or not be uptight about rules or regulations.
All this is strawman logical fallacies. I'm sure you know what a strawman is.

Your main objection seems to be that you think I would be drawing erroneous conclusions about you based on the fact you use the F word all the time, by your own admission. I don't think I would. If I heard you enough in real life I could peg you as an exception (if you are an exception). The fact you might be an exception, if you are an exception, doesn't render my observations about people who use heavy profanity without basis or reasoning.

What did SpringCreek mean when characterizing blue collar profanity as "a sort of local dialect"? It was clear to me exactly what he was saying, and I thought it was an apt way of putting it. I was agreeing and expanding on that to let him know I understood his experience at the blue collar job.

In any event I think it would be foolish of you to suppose, which you seem to be doing, people aren't always paying attention to the kind of language others are using and how that choice of language sends messages about their socio-economic status, status in general, educational background, attitudes and moods, or to suppose it's erroneous for them to pay attention to those messages. So, no, I wasn't joking.
 
ideasrule
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

Wow. Would I be jumping to a conclusion with no evidence or reasoning whatsoever to characterize your reaction to my observations as emotionally charged?
I suppose that's accurate, but it's also hard to judge somebody else's emotions over the Internet. I think I came across as more emotionally charged than I intended.

My reaction was based on the fact that I had no idea where your conclusions came from. Where did your observations come from? Did you talk with blue-collar workers and teenagers, who then told you why they use F***? Did you talk with them, then make your own deduction based on what they did tell you? Did you get your observations from scientific research? Were you just speculating? This is GD, and I don't expect everything to be backed up by published papers. However, if it's only backed by your observations, "My observations are different" would be a perfectly valid counterargument.

Likewise, use of the word "f***" doesn't just express anger, it also perpetuates and generates anger.
I don't know many blue-collar workers. If you have friends who are blue-collar workers and they agree that using F*** lets them stay angry, I'll accept your judgement and agree with you on this.

Yeah, I said "not under the thumb of the man". The F word is prohibited by all kinds of authorities seeking to control the behavior of teenagers where ever teenage behavior needs controlling. To resort to using it as soon as you're out of earshot of authority says you're not under the thumb of "the man", because those who are won't use it even when the authority is absent.

And, yeah, the same kids who resort are also the ones most likely to smoke pot, drink, etc.
My observations are different, and I suspect you don't have much experience with teenagers. The word is a generic way of expressing frustration/bewilderment, and even teenagers who are perfectly happy to conform to the rules use it in this way. When someone uses the word just after falling off their bike or burning their hand on the stove, "the man" (whoever that is) is probably very low on their list of priorities.

Your main objection seems to be that you think I would be drawing erroneous conclusions about you based on the fact you use the F word all the time, by your own admission.
That was a weak objection, and I'm not saying that it applies to everyone.

What did SpringCreek mean when characterizing blue collar profanity as "a sort of local dialect"? It was clear to me exactly what he was saying, and I thought it was an apt way of putting it. I was agreeing and expanding on that to let him know I understood his experience at the blue collar job.
I agree with SpringCreek's comments more than I agree with yours. It's true that different socioeconomic groups use language in different ways, just as it's true that different occasions call for different language. You wouldn't speak the same way in Congress as you would in a strip club, and I'm not doubting that in any way. What I'm doubting is your assumption that people are constantly thinking about how the way they speak reflects their inner psyche. In all likelihood, they're simply following the convention set by their peers without thinking too hard about it.
 
Ouabache
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I don't use this word in conversation. However I do realize it is contextual,
commonly accepted in some settings, blue collar (e.g plumbing, carpentry, construction work), and
military settings. In college, I recall some student journalists began using f* word and others in our
school newspaper (because of common usage amoung peers). They were eventually censored,
though these young writers believed their freedom of speech was compromised.

I was tracing the history of the English language and note many vulgar, what we
consider profane words, are of Germanic origin via O.E. & M.E. (old and middle English)
Many examples may be found in the http://www.etymonline.com/index.php" [Broken]).
What we consider polite vocabulary for the very same nouns & verbs, come to us, mostly by way of Latin.
Point to Ponder: So why are some words profane while their synonyms are quite acceptable?
 
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Re: Do You Use The "F" Word In Real Life?

I never really curse. I try not to. I don't mind when people curse. However, it does annoy me when people use the F-word for no reason. It especially annoys me when they add emphasis to it.....
 

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