Does a bullet fall at a greater force?

In summary, the question asks whether a bullet shot upwards will fall at an equal or greater force. Neglecting air resistance, the bullet will experience a constant force of gravity. This means that at a given height, the speed of the bullet will be the same whether it is going up or down. Including air resistance, the bullet will lose energy and fall at a slower speed. Ultimately, the bullet will reach its original position with the same velocity it had when it was shot.
  • #1
roxas
21
0
okay my question is kinda stupid, and i know i totally sux at physics.
if a bullet is shot upwards, will it fall at an equal or greater force? i know its decelerating as it is shot up, and it would be acclerating as it falls, and so wouldn't it fall at a greater force?
 
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  • #2
roxas said:
okay my question is kinda stupid, and i know i totally sux at physics.
if a bullet is shot upwards, will it fall at an equal or greater force? i know its decelerating as it is shot up, and it would be acclerating as it falls, and so wouldn't it fall at a greater force?
Greater or equal force than what?
 
  • #3
the force when it was shot upwards, before reaching it highest point and falling
 
  • #4
At the point when you actually shoot the bullet, the forst will be very great. Afterwards, if you neglect air resistance, the force acting on the bullet is pretty much constant and there is only one: gravity that acts as the weight of the bullet.
 
  • #5
I assume you actually mean "speed" rather than "force". As quantum crash said, neglecting air resistance, the only force on a bullet is gravity and that is constant. One way to look at speed is to use conservation of energy. Since the potential energy depends only on height, at a given height going up or down, kinetic energy= total energy- potential energy is the same and so the speed, at that height is the same whether the bullet is going up or down. If we include air resistance, it will "rob" the bullet of energy so at a given height, the bullet coming down will be slower than going up.
 
  • #6
okay thx:smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :smile: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:
 
  • #7
Well, technically, neglecting air resistance, as is so popular in physics these days, if the bullet were to collide with an object at the instant it is shot out of the gun, it would apply the same force as if the bullet was falling back to its original position. But hallsofivy is very right. another way to look at it as it has a constant ACCELERATION of -9.8m/s where down is negative. at the highest point of the bullet's trajectory, the bullet has an instantaneous velocity of 0, and then falls for the same amount of time at the same acceleration as it did whilst traveling upwards, and will achieve the exact opposite velocity once it gets to the point from whence it came. Now, obviously in the real world, this is not the case because the bullet would have hit terminal velocity by then, and the acceleration due to gravity would go away.
 

Related to Does a bullet fall at a greater force?

1. Does the weight of the bullet affect its force when falling?

Yes, the weight of the bullet does affect its force when falling. According to Newton's Second Law of Motion, the force of an object is directly proportional to its mass. This means that a heavier bullet will have a greater force when falling compared to a lighter bullet.

2. Does the speed of the bullet affect its force when falling?

Yes, the speed of the bullet does affect its force when falling. According to Newton's Second Law of Motion, the force of an object is directly proportional to its velocity. This means that a faster bullet will have a greater force when falling compared to a slower bullet.

3. Does air resistance play a role in the force of a falling bullet?

Yes, air resistance does play a role in the force of a falling bullet. As the bullet falls, it will encounter air resistance, which will act against the force of gravity. This means that the bullet will experience a slightly lower force due to air resistance, but it will still fall at a significant force.

4. Can the shape of the bullet affect its force when falling?

Yes, the shape of the bullet can affect its force when falling. The shape of a bullet can affect its aerodynamics, which can impact its speed and air resistance when falling. A more streamlined and aerodynamic shape will experience less air resistance, resulting in a slightly higher force when falling.

5. Is the force of a falling bullet the same as the force of a bullet being shot from a gun?

No, the force of a falling bullet is not the same as the force of a bullet being shot from a gun. When a bullet is shot from a gun, it is propelled forward with a significant force due to the explosion of gunpowder. As it falls, the force of gravity will act on the bullet, but it will be significantly lower than the force of the initial shot.

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