Does physics support the notion of eternity?

In summary: The notion of infinity is a concept that is dealt with by the study of mathematics, not physics.In summary, the conversation started with a question about whether time is infinite or not. Some people argued that physics supports the idea of eternity, while others said it was more of a philosophical question. The discussion then turned to the relationship between infinity and mathematics, and whether physicists believe in infinities or not. Some argued that infinity is a useful concept in math, while others said it has no place in physics. The conversation ended with a suggestion to focus on studying rather than engaging in philosophical debates.
  • #1
zeromodz
246
0
Or time being infinite?
 
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  • #2
I would assume that physics does support the notion of eternity seems as space-time is a continuum and will last for an infinite amount of time. :)
 
  • #3
zeromodz said:
Or time being infinite?

Most physicists would probably say your question is too philosophical to merit a serious scientific response (the proverbial "what exactly do you mean?" right). However, even after all the chemical and physical reactions have taken place and there is nothing left in this universe but radiation, I'm tempted to agree with the above response that the spacetime continuum will still be here. There just won't be any meaningful objects within it. So in that sense, yes the universe could exist eternally -- just not in any recognizable fashion.

Edit: The only problem with the above reasoning would be if the laws of physics in this universe somehow changed drastically. To understand if that can happen, or how it can happen, we need to more about the nature of reality. Hopefully the LHC will give us some knowledge towards that front and help us establish, at long last, a sound TOE.
 
  • #4
I don't know about the past, but since we exist here and now, then no matter how far into the future something goes, it will all ways be a finite amount of time between then and now.
 
  • #5
matisamd said:
As far as my understanding goes eternity is analogious to infinity and mathmaticians use infinity, physicists hate mathmaticians that use infinity becaue, as the french don't beieve custard exists physacists don't believe in infinities.
No, its the other way around. Some mathematicians got crazy while trying to understand infinites. For physicists infinite time / force / energy just means: "Ain't going to happen. Problem solved" :smile:
 
  • #6
Hmmmmmmmm...

I suppose that physics sort of supports such a notion given the fact that it is unknown at present whether or not the universe has always had a timelike component.

Here's another way of looking at it: math 'supports the notion' of infinity, and time is a quantity that can be assigned a number for an amount, so if a period of time were assigned infinity for its duration you would have eternity.
 
  • #7
Galap said:
Hmmmmmmmm...
... it is unknown at present whether or not the universe has always had a timelike component.

Since the notion of "always" is only applicable provided that there is a timelike component,
it is true that "the universe has always had a timelike component".
 
  • #8
As far as my understanding goes eternity is analogious to infinity and mathmaticians use infinity, physicists hate mathmaticians that use infinity becaue, as the french don't beieve custard exists physacists don't believe in infinities.

thats how i understand that anyway :) but i learned all i know from startrek reruns and topgear :D
what on Earth are you guys talking about. Most physicists I know accept infinity pretty well.
You don't believe in the reality of Integrals?
We can perfectly calculate Riemann sums with integrals! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riemann_sum
and this is infinite little bars!

Someone should delete these stupid posts.
The internet needs government moderation.
 
Last edited:
  • #9
zeromodz said:
Or time being infinite?
time is finite when it comes to how long your brain will function! so quit the philosophical banter and study!
Build a particle accelerator!
 
  • #10
tot said:
what on Earth are you guys talking about. Most physicists I know accept infinity pretty well.
You don't believe in the reality of Integrals?
We can perfectly calculate Riemann sums with integrals! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riemann_sum
and this is infinite little bars!

Someone should delete these stupid posts.
The internet needs government moderation.

Relax, tiger. The person who started the thread inquired about "the notion of eternity" and "infinite time." This is a physics forum, not a Catholic seminary.
 

Related to Does physics support the notion of eternity?

1. What is the concept of eternity in physics?

In physics, eternity refers to a state of infinite time or existence. It is often associated with the idea of an unchanging and timeless universe.

2. Does current physics theories support the idea of eternity?

The current theories and laws of physics do not explicitly support the concept of eternity. However, some theories, such as the multiverse theory, suggest the possibility of an eternal cycle of universes.

3. Can the laws of physics explain the concept of eternity?

The laws of physics are based on observable phenomena and are limited to explaining the workings of our universe. They are not capable of explaining the concept of eternity as it goes beyond the scope of our understanding.

4. Are there any scientific experiments or evidence that support the idea of eternity?

There is currently no scientific experiment or evidence that definitively supports the idea of eternity. It is a philosophical and metaphysical concept that cannot be proven or disproven through scientific means.

5. How do physicists view the concept of eternity?

The concept of eternity is not a central focus in physics, as it is beyond the scope of scientific inquiry. However, some physicists may have personal beliefs or opinions about eternity, but these views do not influence their scientific research and findings.

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