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Programs Double Degree in Physics and Electical Engineering?

Hi!

I'm about to take my senior year in high school, and I was originally planning on taking electrical engineering plus some extra classes in physics. I like to work with my hands and to create things, so engineering is sort of a no-brainer for me, but it's also very important for me to understand modern physics, ie quantum mechanics and relativity, with all the hairy mathematics and whatnot. I haven't seen an EE curriculum that involves any of those.

The thing is, the university I'm applying to compresses 5 years worth of engineering into 4 years without summer breaks (which I'm fine with, since I spend a good chunk of my summers learning anyway), and the pace is very fast, according to the people who've been there. I'm afraid that I might graduate without a good enough understanding of either, no matter how motivated I am.

As for the career I want to get into, I really, really want to work on something space related.

What are your thoughts? Thank you!
 

Choppy

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Perhaps you're looking at this backwards. Instead of "the school I want to go offers this..." perhaps you should be thinking along the lines of "the program that I want would include these..." and then choose a school that offers the closest match to what you want. So for example - does it have to be electrical engineering? Have you looked into any engineering physics programs for example?
 
Perhaps you're looking at this backwards. Instead of "the school I want to go offers this..." perhaps you should be thinking along the lines of "the program that I want would include these..." and then choose a school that offers the closest match to what you want. So for example - does it have to be electrical engineering? Have you looked into any engineering physics programs for example?
Yes, I really do want to do electrical engineering. Applied physics/engineering physics doesn't seem to go into much detail when it comes to circuits, controls, etc. Unfortunately, I only have 2 options for college because they're the ones with EE that my mother would let me go to (she refuses to let me apply to others :/ ). Ideally I would take EE with a minor in physics, but what worries me is that they might not offer that, as I cannot find any information about that. I just realized I should try calling them :P I'll try to do that today
 

ZapperZ

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Hi!

I'm about to take my senior year in high school, and I was originally planning on taking electrical engineering plus some extra classes in physics. I like to work with my hands and to create things, so engineering is sort of a no-brainer for me, but it's also very important for me to understand modern physics, ie quantum mechanics and relativity, with all the hairy mathematics and whatnot. I haven't seen an EE curriculum that involves any of those.

The thing is, the university I'm applying to compresses 5 years worth of engineering into 4 years without summer breaks (which I'm fine with, since I spend a good chunk of my summers learning anyway), and the pace is very fast, according to the people who've been there. I'm afraid that I might graduate without a good enough understanding of either, no matter how motivated I am.

As for the career I want to get into, I really, really want to work on something space related.

What are your thoughts? Thank you!
Have you ever considered going into Accelerator Science?

https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/accelerator-physics-a-field-where-jobs-go-begging.410271/

You can enter this field either from the physics side, or the EE side. It is one field of study that smoothly straddles and bridges both physics and EE. It is where you have your cake and you get to eat it too.

Zz.
 
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Yes, I really do want to do electrical engineering. Applied physics/engineering physics doesn't seem to go into much detail when it comes to circuits, controls, etc. Unfortunately, I only have 2 options for college because they're the ones with EE that my mother would let me go to (she refuses to let me apply to others :/ ). Ideally I would take EE with a minor in physics, but what worries me is that they might not offer that, as I cannot find any information about that. I just realized I should try calling them :P I'll try to do that today
Make sure you apply to more than 2 schools. What happens if you do not get accepted in either school? I would say, 5 is a safe bet. 2 dream schools, 2 schools you know may get into, 1 school that is a "guarantee."
 
Make sure you apply to more than 2 schools. What happens if you do not get accepted in either school? I would say, 5 is a safe bet. 2 dream schools, 2 schools you know may get into, 1 school that is a "guarantee."
Honestly, they're not my dream schools. It's my mother who has the final say, and she's not letting me apply to others. :(

These are local schools though, and I'm hoping to get a scholarship abroad. I have my fingers crossed!
 

Choppy

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Honestly, they're not my dream schools. It's my mother who has the final say, and she's not letting me apply to others. :(
While it's often important to consider the input from your parents, and I understand that going against their wishes may come with a loss of financial support, when it comes to decisions on higher education remember that you're the one who will be doing the work, so it is ultimately your decision.
 

StatGuy2000

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Honestly, they're not my dream schools. It's my mother who has the final say, and she's not letting me apply to others. :(

These are local schools though, and I'm hoping to get a scholarship abroad. I have my fingers crossed!
I have a few questions:

(1) What country are you from?

(2) Why is your mother against you applying to different schools? If you don't get accepted to the school she wants you to go to, what did she have in mind for you?

(3) Are you looking into schools outside of your country?
 
I have a few questions:

(1) What country are you from?

(2) Why is your mother against you applying to different schools? If you don't get accepted to the school she wants you to go to, what did she have in mind for you?

(3) Are you looking into schools outside of your country?
1. I'm from the Philippines

2. She has an authoritarian streak, and she insists she must have the final say. She also went through some tough times at my age, and she thinks I'm spoiled because I can choose the degree I want to take instead of having to deal with financial constraints. I have to argue with her all the time. My high school right now is actually one she didn't want me to go to, and we had a pretty big fight over it. She doesn't like other schools because of their "culture" and the stereotypes they have. Those 2 schools are not too hard to get into actually, so she seems pretty confident I'll get in, although honestly if it were up to me, I would apply to about 4 or 5.

3. Yes, I am, and in Japan specifically, because it's the only place my mom likes, plus I'm learning Japanese. Yep, we had to fight over this too. I'll be needing a scholarship though, so none of this is sure.
 
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While it's often important to consider the input from your parents, and I understand that going against their wishes may come with a loss of financial support, when it comes to decisions on higher education remember that you're the one who will be doing the work, so it is ultimately your decision.
Believe me, I would make my own decisions if I could, but my parents are more likely to impose more restrictions on me if I go against them now, instead of kicking me out/cutting down on support. I'm just glad I can choose the program I want to get into at this point, even though it's clear they don't like my choices and they're still weakly trying to change my mind.
 

StatGuy2000

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Believe me, I would make my own decisions if I could, but my parents are more likely to impose more restrictions on me if I go against them now, instead of kicking me out/cutting down on support. I'm just glad I can choose the program I want to get into at this point, even though it's clear they don't like my choices and they're still weakly trying to change my mind.
I have some additional questions (based on your reply above):

1. Are you the eldest son/daughter in your family? (I'm aware that in many Asian societies, the eldest child is responsible for caring for the parents later in life -- I'm assuming it is similar in the Philippines as well)

2. Do you need to rely on your parents for financial support while you will be attending university (even if you accept scholarships outside of the Philippines, say for example in Japan, as you mentioned earlier)?
 

Grinkle

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engineering is sort of a no-brainer for me
My advice is to study engineering if you want to make a career in engineering. In your first two years you will take physics courses. If you want to take physics electives your junior and senior year, do so. You can't know right now how much bandwidth you will have to do that. A physics degree per se is not an added benefit for a new college grad looking for an engineering job, so I wouldn't worry about whether your diploma says you have a major or a minor in physics if you are applying for jobs as an electrical engineer.
 
I have some additional questions (based on your reply above):

1. Are you the eldest son/daughter in your family? (I'm aware that in many Asian societies, the eldest child is responsible for caring for the parents later in life -- I'm assuming it is similar in the Philippines as well)

2. Do you need to rely on your parents for financial support while you will be attending university (even if you accept scholarships outside of the Philippines, say for example in Japan, as you mentioned earlier)?
1. Yep, I'm the eldest child. Here in the Philippines though, the one who takes care of the parents doesn't depend on the age, but one of the children *is* expected to take care of them.

2. Yes, I'll have to rely on them for financial support, which is actually what is expected from parents here in the Philippines. As for scholarships abroad, I guess it'll depend on what kind of scholarship I'll be getting. If it's a full ride with an allowance, I guess I won't, but if it's only partial, then yes. I would be willing to work part time, though.
 
Update: I contacted the university and they said they're not offering the double degree next year, even though they posted it on the site...

Doing minors and taking extra courses isn't really a thing here either, so I guess I'll just try to self-study physics and look for professors I can talk to. I'm also not sure if I'll change my mind in the future and decide to do experimental physics, and if that's the case I'll have to get a job to support myself financially for a PhD and/or a master's degree, which would be much easier with an engineering degree. I do know that's not an easy route and there'll be a lot of overhead, but hey, I hear it's doable.

I really like the idea of accelerator science. Maybe it'll be good to have both an engineering and a physics background for that?

Thanks for all the advice! I really appreciate it!!

PS: Wow, took me a while to notice I misspelled the title. Idk how to change it, sorry [emoji51]
 

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