Drought (possibly 'climate change') and famine 2200-2000 BCE

In summary, a famine in Egypt during the Early Helladic III period caused the relocation of tribes and led to the collapse of civilizations in other parts of the world.
  • #1
Astronuc
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Like the thread on Earthquakes possibly contributing to the collapse of civilizations in the last Bronze Age, I heard that a famine impacted Egypt, and possibly the Aegean region and perhaps into Eastern Europe and parts of North Africa during the period 2200 - 2000 BCE (aka Early Helladic III or Tiryns culture period (or EHIII) in ancient Greek history).

Apparently some evidence has been found based on sediments in the Nile delta and other ponds/lakes in Egypt.

For example - https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg17323271-800-how-egypt-was-felled-by-famine-in-2180-bc/

ancient Egypt’s mighty pyramid builders were powerless in the face of the famine that helped bring down their civilisation around 2180 BC.
. . .

Dwindling rains in the Ethiopian highlands would have meant fewer plants to stabilise the soil. When rain did fall it would have washed large amounts of soil into the Blue Nile and into Egypt, along with sediment from the White Nile.

Blue Nile mud has a different isotope signature from that of the White Nile. So by analysing isotope differences in mud deposited in the Nile Delta, Michael Krom of Leeds University worked out what proportion of sediment came from each branch of the river.

Krom reasons that during periods of drought, the amount of Blue Nile mud in the river would be relatively high. . . . .

I was listening to a video that described changes in sediment layers, which appeared to be related to dust storms, which could also bury areas experiencing drought. The New Scientist article is a different source of information on the drought and resulting famine.

Drought and famine could play a role in forcing the relocation of tribes from one region to another in search of food and viable land.
 
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Earth sciences news on Phys.org
  • #2
Astronuc said:
Drought and famine could play a role in forcing the relocation of tribes from one region to another in search of food and viable land.
With respect.
In any region, over a 200 year period, there will be at least one “1 in 100 year” drought. The same goes for floods.
If you gather sufficient data, and look closely, you will find evidence of an event that will support your self-fulfilling hypothesis.
 
  • #3
Baluncore said:
In any region, over a 200 year period, there will be at least one “1 in 100 year” drought. The same goes for floods.
We have them every 15 years. You must be thinking of “1 in 1000 year”.
 
  • #4
Keith_McClary said:
We have them every 15 years.
I think you are not experiencing all of them, but are seeing them on the news.
First, for a given location (such as where you live), a one in 100 year event would be expected to occur on average once in 100 years. However, across all of Australia you would expect the one in 100 year event to be exceeded somewhere far more often than once in a century!
https://theconversation.com/what-is...nd-why-do-they-keep-happening-so-often-157589
 
  • #5
Baluncore said:
I think you are not experiencing all of them, but are seeing them on the news.
I think that what was historically "1 in 100" is now "1 in 15".
 
  • #6
Reminded me of the Discword quote

Million-to-one chances...crop up nine times out of ten.​

 

Related to Drought (possibly 'climate change') and famine 2200-2000 BCE

1. What caused the drought and famine during 2200-2000 BCE?

The exact cause of the drought and famine during this time period is still debated among scientists and historians. Some theories suggest that it was a natural climatic event, while others argue that it was caused by human activity such as deforestation and overgrazing.

2. How long did the drought and famine last?

The duration of the drought and famine is also a topic of debate. Some sources suggest that it lasted for 200 years, while others argue that it was a series of shorter droughts and famines that occurred over a longer period of time.

3. What regions were affected by the drought and famine?

The drought and famine of 2200-2000 BCE were widespread and affected many regions around the world. Some of the most severely impacted areas were the Middle East, North Africa, and parts of Asia. However, there is evidence that other regions, such as Europe and the Americas, may have also experienced some level of drought and famine during this time.

4. How did people cope with the drought and famine?

The coping strategies for the drought and famine varied depending on the region and the resources available. Some communities turned to agriculture and livestock management techniques to adapt to the changing climate, while others migrated to more fertile areas. There is also evidence of increased trade and exchange of goods between communities as a means of survival.

5. What lessons can we learn from the drought and famine of 2200-2000 BCE?

The drought and famine of 2200-2000 BCE serve as a reminder of the vulnerability of human societies to environmental changes. It highlights the importance of sustainable resource management and adaptation strategies in the face of climate change. It also serves as a cautionary tale of the potential consequences of human activities on the environment and the need for responsible stewardship of our planet.

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