Dynamics: Newton's Second Law_Tension_1

  • Thread starter yandereni
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement



*Note: I'm really stuck in this part of Newton's 2nd Law so I may be asking a few more questions after this to practice for our upcoming examinations.

A cable supporting a 2125kg elevator has a maximum strength of 21750N. What maximum upward acceleration can it give without breaking?


Homework Equations



1. Forcevertical= Forcetension + Forcegravity
2. Force= (mass)(acceleration)

The Attempt at a Solution


What I did is:
Forcevertical=21750N + [(-9.8m/s2)(2125kg)]
Forcevertical=925N

Then after solving the first part, i used the 2nd equation then did this:
925N = (2125N)(a)
a = 0.435 m/s2

I'm not quite sure if I'm right in this problem.

Thank you in advance.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
NascentOxygen
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Method looks right. I've misplaced my sliderule at the moment, so haven't checked your multiplication answer. :)
 
  • #3
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The calculations are correct. You did nothing wrong that I ca tell.
 
  • #4
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thank you for checking it! but i dont know why my classmates keep on proving me wrong though
 
  • #5
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Well the question is basically asking how fast you can move the elevator up with respect to the mass of the elevator. So the answer makes sense. If they're arguing with it I'm curious as to what they're doing.
 
  • #6
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Method looks right. I've misplaced my sliderule at the moment, so haven't checked your multiplication answer. :)
Thank you! I thought i did it wrong but it was right all along. :)
 
  • #7
Well, even I seem to get this answer only.
Your answer seems right to me.
 
  • #8
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I think you are right ,,
I'm wondering about what your friend said ,,,
 
  • #9
haruspex
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thank you for checking it! but i dont know why my classmates keep on proving me wrong though
You don't say what answer others get, so it's hard to tell. An important thing to notice is that the calculation involves taking the difference of two numbers that are close together. This creates the risk of error magnification. E.g. if you take g as 10m/s2 you get only half the answer.
 

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