Electric/Gravitational Forces

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In summary, to find the ratio between the electrical and gravitational forces acting between a proton and an electron, you divide the equation F= k(q)(q')/r^2 by the equation F= G(m1)(m2)/r^2, using the absolute values of the charges (q) and masses (m) for the proton and electron.
  • #1
thst1003
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Find the ratio of the magnitudes of the electrical and the gravitational forces acting between a proton and an electron separated by an arbitrary distance d.


F= k(q)(q')/r^2 and
0f36df929ac9d711a8ba8c5658c3bfee.png


The q's are in an absolute value sign. How do I find the ratio? Is it as simply as dividing it out?
 
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  • #2
thst1003 said:
The q's are in an absolute value sign. I believe there is an additional equation similar to this one that deals with gravity that I need to use as well but I can't find it.

Although I have a lot of trouble believing that you have not encountered this already, I will just take your post at face value. Here is the equation you seek:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_law_of_universal_gravitation
 
  • #3
I changed the question. I have encountered it.
 
  • #4
that's a trivial problem asked on electrostatics. Yep, you divide it for a ratio.
 
  • #5
What exactly do you divide? Is it Electrical force/Gravitational force using 1.6e-19 C for the electron and the electron? So it would be k(q)(q) / G(m1)(m2) ?
 
  • #6
thst1003 said:
What exactly do you divide? Is it Electrical force/Gravitational force using 1.6e-19 C for the electron and the electron? So it would be k(q)(q) / G(m1)(m2) ?

In short: yes. You divide exactly what you were ASKED to divide (emphasis mine below):

thst1003 said:
Find the ratio of the magnitudes of the electrical and the gravitational forces acting between a proton and an electron separated by an arbitrary distance d.
 

1. What is the difference between electric and gravitational forces?

Electric forces are interactions between charged particles, whereas gravitational forces are interactions between masses. Electric forces can be attractive or repulsive, while gravitational forces are always attractive.

2. How do electric and gravitational forces affect the motion of objects?

Electric forces can cause objects to accelerate or change direction, depending on the charges involved. Gravitational forces can cause objects to accelerate towards each other, resulting in orbits or collisions.

3. What factors affect the strength of electric and gravitational forces?

The strength of electric forces depends on the magnitude of the charges involved and the distance between them. Gravitational forces are determined by the masses of the objects and the distance between them, as described by Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation.

4. How are electric and gravitational forces related to each other?

Both electric and gravitational forces are fundamental forces of nature that act over a distance. However, electric forces are much stronger than gravitational forces, as the strength of electric forces is determined by the charge of the particles involved, while gravitational forces are determined by the mass of the objects involved.

5. Can electric and gravitational forces be shielded or canceled out?

Electric forces can be shielded by placing a conducting material between charged particles, as the charges will redistribute themselves on the surface of the material. Gravitational forces cannot be shielded or canceled out, as they act on all objects with mass regardless of their composition.

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