1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Engineering (Electrical) Engineering and Career Fields

  1. Aug 7, 2008 #1

    I just finished my first year of engineering and I am about to enter my second year. I decided to go into eletrical engineering because it seems like it has a very broad range of fields to enter in.

    Now I am also extremely interested in physics in almost all departments mainly QM, nuclear and particle physics. Not meaning to bash anyone here but from what I could see, enigneering is the more "stable" career path to follow and this is why I chose engineering over physics.

    Now I am in a very confused state right now. I am wondering if engineering truly is a good choice. At first I wanted to practice medicine and to become a medical doctor/dentist. The eight years of schooling pushed me away and this is why I went into engineering (which I am actually happy with).

    I guess I consider myself an intelligent being (aside from being very fluent in english, I always hated english class). I have obtiand a GPA of 12.2 (out of 13) without having to study much. I plan on doing my masters after I graduate and maybe even stay in school for a bit longer.

    BUT now I wanna ask these (vague) questions first:

    1. Is it relatively easy to get a job if I graduate as an electrical engineer?
    2. On average, will I be financially secured?
    3. With my electrical engineering degree, can I enter fields such as:
    nanotechnology, QM related work, biomechanics, particle physics, magnetic/electrical fields
    Or do I have to further my education past the scope of eletrical engineering. I am not too interested in "general" electrical engineering work (I would enjoy something more interesting).
    4. Will I actually be able to enjoy life as I persue my degree in engineering? I mean, I also want to go out and have fun and party during the weekends and talk to girls. I don't want to be tied down to just book work but I am willing to do all the work that is required.

    Sometimes I feel like being a dentist wouldn't have been so bad. I mean, I am almost gaurunteed a good amount of money and a stable life... But engineering has far more interest to me.

    Thanks guys,
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 7, 2008 #2


    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    1. If your school has a career and placement services office, you should go check that out and see just how many employers are recruiting people from your field, and whether or not these are jobs you'd be happy with. (Note, however, that things can change in a few years, and what's popular now, won't necessarily be popular in the future).

    2. There are no guarantees with respect to financial security these days. That being said, as long as you have a skill set that's in demand, you'll be in a good position.

    3. In general, yes. Although, if you intend to do fundamental research in these areas, you'll need a graduate degree. And it is harder to get into a physics program from an engineering background than if you're coming through physics - but not impossible.

    4. Everyone has to find their own balance. First year is generally a good taste of what you're in store for.
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?