EM radiation cross over materials

In summary, the material's properties, specifically its phonon modes and the presence of conduction electrons, determine whether or not electromagnetic radiation can pass through it. Metals, being conductors, have free electrons that will block and re-radiate light, while other materials may allow certain wavelengths to pass through depending on their molecular structure.
  • #1
live4physics
24
0
Anybody knows if there is a rule for EM radiation cross over materials ?
The wavelenght in comparison the size (or structure) of molecule is determinant ?
Ex. why infrared pass through the concrete but not metalics ?

Thank you.
 
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  • #2
live4physics said:
Anybody knows if there is a rule for EM radiation cross over materials ?
The wavelenght in comparison the size (or structure) of molecule is determinant ?
Ex. why infrared pass through the concrete but not metalics ?

Thank you.

You may want to read our FAQ in the General Physics forum first, especially on the post on photon going through a material. Most of these properties are governed by what we call the "phonon" modes of the material, i.e. the lattice vibration modes. For metal, there is an added complication from the presence of the conduction electrons that creates additional collective behavior called the "plasmons".

Zz.
 
  • #3
ZapperZ said:
You may want to read our FAQ in the General Physics forum first, especially on the post on photon going through a material. Most of these properties are governed by what we call the "phonon" modes of the material, i.e. the lattice vibration modes. For metal, there is an added complication from the presence of the conduction electrons that creates additional collective behavior called the "plasmons".

Zz.

Thanks but I didn´t find any satisfactory answer for that.
Can anybody help me ?
 
  • #4
metals are conductors. light can't penetrate a conductor
 

Related to EM radiation cross over materials

1. What are EM radiation cross over materials?

EM radiation cross over materials refer to materials that have the ability to block or absorb certain types of electromagnetic (EM) radiation while allowing others to pass through. These materials are designed to control the amount and type of EM radiation that can pass through them, making them useful in a variety of applications such as shielding electronic devices or protecting against harmful radiation.

2. How do EM radiation cross over materials work?

EM radiation cross over materials work by utilizing their unique molecular structure to selectively allow certain wavelengths of EM radiation to pass through while blocking or absorbing others. This can be achieved through a variety of mechanisms, such as reflection, absorption, or scattering, depending on the specific material and its composition.

3. What types of EM radiation can be blocked or absorbed by these materials?

EM radiation cross over materials can be designed to block or absorb a wide range of EM radiation, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays. The specific type of EM radiation that can be controlled depends on the properties of the material and its intended use.

4. What are some common applications of EM radiation cross over materials?

EM radiation cross over materials have a variety of practical applications, such as in electronic devices to shield against interference, in medical equipment to protect against harmful radiation, in energy-efficient windows to control heat transfer, and in military technology for stealth operations. They can also be used in research and scientific experiments to manipulate and control EM radiation.

5. Are there any potential risks associated with using EM radiation cross over materials?

While EM radiation cross over materials can provide many benefits, there are also potential risks associated with their use. These include the possibility of unintentionally blocking necessary EM radiation, health risks from exposure to certain types of radiation, and environmental concerns related to the production and disposal of these materials. It is important to carefully consider these risks and take appropriate precautions when using EM radiation cross over materials.

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