Experiment involving Kepler's laws

In summary, Erwin is a high school student who has been assigned to conduct a physics experiment. He wants to use Kepler's laws to predict the position of celestial objects in a month, but is unsure if this is feasible for a high school student. However, he does not have much knowledge or experience in astronomy and may not have enough time to learn and complete the experiment. It is suggested that he considers a different experiment.
  • #1
Shukie
95
0
Hi all,

In physics class I recently got the assignment to conduct an experiment. It can be anything I want, as long as it involves a substantial amount of physics. I came up with the idea of doing something involving Kepler's laws. I thought it'd be interesting to use them to predict the position of several celestial objects in a month. I'd do all the theoretical work now and in a month I'd head out to see if my predictions were accurate. My question, would this be a feasibly experiment for a high school student or is the level of physics and math involved too much?

Kind regards,

Erwin
 
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  • #2
An idea for an experiment is the starting point, but the immediate next step is the study the feasibility of bringing the idea to fruition.

Do you have the knowledge and expertise to carry it through in the given amount of time?
You may be a high school student, but if you are also an astronomy buff you probably know how to proceed with astronomical measurements and what they involve. However, you don't mention that astronomy is your hobby, so I assume that you don't know much about it. One month is not sufficient time to learn from scratch and without someone to teach you. Getting a telescope and learning how to use it to make measurements will eat up most of your time. Your post tells me that you don't know what you are getting into or how to plan your proposed experiment. You say
Shukie said:
I'd do all the theoretical work now and in a month I'd head out to see if my predictions were accurate.
What predictions? How can you predict where an object will be one month from now without determining where it is right now? I don't want to appear that I am haranguing you so I will stop here. I think you should consider something else.
 

Related to Experiment involving Kepler's laws

1. What are Kepler's laws?

Kepler's laws are three scientific principles that describe the motion of planets and other objects in our solar system. They were discovered by astronomer Johannes Kepler in the 17th century.

2. What is the first law of Kepler?

The first law, also known as the law of orbits, states that all planets move in elliptical orbits around the sun, with the sun at one of the two foci of the ellipse.

3. What is the second law of Kepler?

The second law, also known as the law of areas, states that a line connecting a planet to the sun will sweep out equal areas in equal amounts of time. This means that a planet will move faster when it is closer to the sun and slower when it is farther away.

4. What is the third law of Kepler?

The third law, also known as the law of harmonies, states that the square of a planet's orbital period is proportional to the cube of its average distance from the sun. In simpler terms, this means that the farther a planet is from the sun, the longer its orbital period will be.

5. How are Kepler's laws used in experiments?

Kepler's laws are used in experiments to study the motion of objects in space and to make predictions about their behavior. They are also used to analyze data from space missions and to better understand the laws of gravity and motion in our solar system.

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