Fecal Transplants: Miracle Cure or Passing Fad?

  • Thread starter BobG
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In summary, scientists do not know if Crohn's is related to the environment or genetic. They think that foreign substances, such as antigens, are a possible cause of inflammation. There is research that suggest that high levels of TNF are present in people with Crohn's disease. There is a potential for fecal transplants to help people with Crohn's disease, but there are some risks involved.
  • #1

BobG

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Yes, fecal transplants. Miracle cure or passing fad.

The Enema of Your Enemy is Your Friend

You can even do this at home. All you need is a bottle of saline, a 2-quart enema bag, and one standard kitchen blender.
 
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  • #2
Bob! PLEASE take this down. I am not opening the link.
There are so few places of sanity in this wierded out world of ours.
PLEASE let Physicsforums stay one of them.


:cry:
 
  • #3
Lacy33 said:
Bob! PLEASE take this down. I am not opening the link.
There are so few places of sanity in this wierded out world of ours.
PLEASE let Physicsforums stay one of them.


:cry:

How long have you been around the General Discussion forum again?

You must not have been around when Moonbear told us about her electroejaculator or when we discussed whether to fold or scrunch. And you definitely must not have been around here for National Talk Like a Pirate Day. :rofl:

Lacy, it's okay. We're welcoming you to join us. You'll love it. :devil:
 
  • #4
It makes sense, but as stated, getting research grants when there is no money to be made is tough. Perhaps it will be possible to clean up the poop and inject just the beneficial stuff.
 
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  • #5
That would suck to go to the doctor and come out with poop in your lungs.
 
  • #6
leroyjenkens said:
That would suck to go to the doctor and come out with poop in your lungs.
Yeah, I would prefer the "bottom up" scenario.
 
  • #7
what happened to eating yogurt? the whole thing stinks, if you ask me.
 
  • #8
I have a 3rd cousin that suffers awfully from Crohn's. I'm sure he would try this if there was a chance to get some relief (or even a cure). I haven't seen him for a couple of years - wonder if there are any gastro-enterologists willing to try something this "out there"?
 
  • #9
i think crohn's is autoimmune. not sure how this would help.
 
  • #10
Proton Soup said:
i think crohn's is autoimmune. not sure how this would help.
Crohn's is not well-understood.

Scientists do not know if the abnormality in the functioning of the immune system in people with Crohn’s disease is a cause, or a result, of the disease. Research shows that the inflammation seen in the GI tract of people with Crohn’s disease involves several factors: the genes the patient has inherited, the immune system itself, and the environment. Foreign substances, also referred to as antigens, are found in the environment. One possible cause for inflammation may be the body’s reaction to these antigens, or that the antigens themselves are the cause for the inflammation. Scientists have found that high levels of a protein produced by the immune system, called tumor necrosis factor (TNF), are present in people with Crohn’s disease.

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/crohns/
 
  • #11
I saw this before on discovery health. Some GI problems are clearly related to disturbances of the flora in the gut and transporting some fecal matter of a healthy person to a sick one could very well help to stimulate recovery of flora to proper levels.
 
  • #12
This is one of these things that are at the same time disgusting and perfectly fecal.

Sorry, I meant "logical".
 
  • #13
Not directed at anyone in the thread, just the notion of a "fecal transplant"
[PLAIN]http://www.grim-planet.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/jesus_facepalm.jpg [Broken]btw... at least an electroejaculator serves a purpose in breeding animals... this is potentially dangerous.Say, have you crazy birds talked about "penile plethysmography" yet? :smile?
 
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1. What is a fecal transplant?

A fecal transplant, also known as a fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), is a procedure in which fecal matter from a healthy donor is transferred to the gastrointestinal tract of a person with a specific medical condition, usually to restore balance to the gut microbiome.

2. What conditions can be treated with fecal transplants?

Fecal transplants have been primarily used to treat recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections, which can cause severe diarrhea and inflammation of the colon. However, there is ongoing research into the potential benefits of FMT for other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and even neurological disorders.

3. How is a fecal transplant performed?

The most common method of fecal transplant is through a colonoscopy, where the fecal matter is delivered directly into the colon. It can also be done through an enema, nasogastric tube, or oral capsules. The procedure typically takes less than an hour and is done on an outpatient basis.

4. Are there any risks or side effects associated with fecal transplants?

While FMT is generally considered safe, there are potential risks and side effects. These can include infection, allergic reactions, and adverse effects on the gut microbiome. It is essential to discuss these risks with a healthcare professional before undergoing a fecal transplant.

5. Is there evidence to support the effectiveness of fecal transplants?

While there have been numerous successful case reports and small studies, the evidence supporting the effectiveness of fecal transplants is still limited. More research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of this procedure. It is important to discuss all available treatment options with a healthcare professional before considering FMT as a treatment option.

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