Find Books for Classical Physics Beginners

In summary, finding books for classical physics beginners is made easier with the wealth of resources available online and in bookstores. From introductory textbooks to study guides and problem-solving manuals, there are plenty of options for those looking to learn the basics of classical physics. Additionally, online forums and discussion boards provide a platform for beginners to ask questions and receive assistance from more experienced individuals. With a variety of resources at their disposal, beginners can easily dive into the world of classical physics and begin building a strong foundation of knowledge.
  • #1
redon
8
0
Hi everyone , can you find some books for classical physics for begginers pls ? thnx
 
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  • #2
We'll need more info on your educational background. Do you have calculus?
 
  • #3
Daverz said:
We'll need more info on your educational background. Do you have calculus?

Im in first year on high school , i understand math well , so what can you suggest me ?
 
  • #4
redon said:
Im in first year on high school , i understand math well , so what can you suggest me ?

51V9nAGI2CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
 
  • #5
redon said:
Im in first year on high school , i understand math well , so what can you suggest me ?

Could you actually say what mathematics you know please.
 
  • #6
How about Conceptual Physics by Hewitt?
 
  • #7
hitmeoff said:
How about Conceptual Physics by Hewitt?

thnx you :)
 
  • #8
Daverz said:
51V9nAGI2CL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

thank you Darverz
 
  • #9
qspeechc said:
Could you actually say what mathematics you know please.

well arithmetics ,geometry , algebra , that's all :(
 
  • #10
redon said:
well arithmetics ,geometry , algebra , that's all :(

That should be all you need to get something out of the Conceptual Physics book (probably the Asimov book as well). This is fine, I actually think you will absorb harder books better later on if you get yourself a good basic understanding of how physics works, without having to worry to much about the math.

Once you learn some trigonometry, then "College Physics" by Serway would do you well. The Feynman Lectures also work very well, but I do believe that requires some elementary calculus.
 
  • #11
hitmeoff said:
That should be all you need to get something out of the Conceptual Physics book (probably the Asimov book as well). This is fine, I actually think you will absorb harder books better later on if you get yourself a good basic understanding of how physics works, without having to worry to much about the math.

Once you learn some trigonometry, then "College Physics" by Serway would do you well. The Feynman Lectures also work very well, but I do believe that requires some elementary calculus.[/QUOTE

First thank youu , for the books you suggests me.
Can you tell me what calculus need to learn for study physics ?thank you
 
  • #12
Generally you need all the basics of calculus for some intro physics course in university..
Usually those calculus-based physics textbooks will give some explanations on math needed..

For calculus-bases physics, I have used 2 text:

-Physics for Scientist and Engineers by Serway/Jewett: it got nice problems. but personally I do not like the explanations

-Fundamentals of Physics by HRW: better explanations, sometimes can be a bit wordy

My advice, if you are still in High School, try to get your fundamentals correct, especially math
 
  • #13
Ashuron said:
Generally you need all the basics of calculus for some intro physics course in university..
Usually those calculus-based physics textbooks will give some explanations on math needed..

For calculus-bases physics, I have used 2 text:

-Physics for Scientist and Engineers by Serway/Jewett: it got nice problems. but personally I do not like the explanations

-Fundamentals of Physics by HRW: better explanations, sometimes can be a bit wordy

My advice, if you are still in High School, try to get your fundamentals correct, especially math

Thank you , i will try :))
 
  • #15

1. What topics are covered in books for classical physics beginners?

Books for classical physics beginners typically cover topics such as mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Some may also include introductory discussions on quantum mechanics and relativity.

2. What level of mathematics is required for understanding books on classical physics?

Most books for classical physics beginners assume a basic understanding of algebra and trigonometry. Some may also require knowledge of calculus, particularly for topics such as mechanics and electromagnetism.

3. Are there any recommended books for self-study in classical physics?

Yes, there are many recommended books for self-study in classical physics. Some popular options include "Concepts of Physics" by H.C. Verma, "University Physics" by Young and Freedman, and "Fundamentals of Physics" by Halliday and Resnick.

4. Is it necessary to have a physics background to understand books on classical physics?

No, a physics background is not necessary. However, a basic understanding of scientific principles and mathematical concepts is helpful in understanding the material.

5. Can books on classical physics be used as a reference for advanced topics?

Some books on classical physics may touch on advanced topics, but they are primarily intended for beginners and may not provide in-depth coverage of advanced concepts. It is recommended to use specialized books for more advanced topics in classical physics.

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