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Find the Minimum Length of a Vibrating String

  1. Jan 17, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    the equation of a stationary wave produced on a string whose both ends are fixed is given by
    y= [0.6sin(pi/10)x]cos(600pi)t
    what could be the smallest length of string?


    2. Relevant equations
    k=2pi/wavelength

    3. The attempt at a solution
    i got the wavelength to be 20 but don't know how to proceed,in the solution it is given that
    "since the string is fixed at both ends the minimum length should be half of the wavelength"i couldn't understand this statement why should it be half?please explain
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2016 #2

    Suraj M

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    Gold Member

    Okay Vijay
    But what exactly are you supposed to find?
     
  4. Jan 17, 2016 #3
    sir we are supposed to find the minimum length of the string.it has been given in the question sir.
     
  5. Jan 17, 2016 #4

    Suraj M

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    As the string is attached on both sides, it's should contain 2 nodes on each end is what I think, so in which case would there be the least number (or fraction ) of both nodes and internodes
    Try drawing all the cases you can think of.
    I hope I'm helpful
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2016
  6. Jan 17, 2016 #5
    thank you,since the two ends must be at rest so they must be nodes and by finding the distance between two consecutive nodes we get the answer.i think this the explanation
     
  7. Jan 18, 2016 #6

    Suraj M

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    So, the answer?
     
  8. Jan 18, 2016 #7

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    You should be able to do a bit of research to find an explanation. Did you try a web search on "string vibration modes"? Do so and take a look at the Hyperphysics web page (Standing Waves on a String) that turns up in the search results.
     
  9. Jan 18, 2016 #8
    it is half of wavelength that is 10.
     
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