Find the net force (in Newtons)

In summary, to accelerate a 110 kg bike and rider from rest to a final velocity of 22.7 m/s in 10 seconds, you would need a force of 249.7 Newton.
  • #1
tica86
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Find the net force (in Newtons) required to accelerate a 110 kg bike and rider from rest to a final velocity of 22.7 m/s in 10 seconds?

since f=ma 110(22.7)=2497 do I divide that by 10 seconds??
 
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  • #2


No. Think about it. If you tried what you are suggesting, your result would have dimensions of [force]/[time], which is not physically meaningful here. You're looking for a force. To get the force, you need to know the acceleration so that you can apply Newton's second law, as you correctly stated. However, you made a mistake. You substituted the velocity (22.7 m/s) in for the acceleration. Velocity is not acceleration -- they are two very different things! I hope you understand how they differ.

In this problem, the acceleration is an unknown. To find it, you will need to consider the kinematics of the problem. ;)
 
  • #3


cepheid said:
No. Think about it. If you tried what you are suggesting, your result would have dimensions of [force]/[time], which is not physically meaningful here. You're looking for a force. To get the force, you need to know the acceleration so that you can apply Newton's second law, as you correctly stated. However, you made a mistake. You substituted the velocity (22.7 m/s) in for the acceleration. Velocity is not acceleration -- they are two very different things! I hope you understand how they differ.

In this problem, the acceleration is an unknown. To find it, you will need to consider the kinematics of the problem. ;)

Thanks for pointing that out. So to find acceleration a=v2-v1/10s
I get a=22.7-0/10=2.27?
 
  • #4


Yeah that looks right to me, provided you assume the acceleration is constant. Acceleration = (change in velocity) / (change in time).
 
  • #5


cepheid said:
Yeah that looks right to me, provided you assume the acceleration is constant. Acceleration = (change in velocity) / (change in time).

So the final answer would be
ma=110(2.27)=249.7N?
 

Related to Find the net force (in Newtons)

1. How do you calculate the net force?

The net force is calculated by adding together all of the individual forces acting on an object. This can be done by using vector addition, where the magnitude and direction of each force is taken into account. The resulting sum is the net force in Newtons.

2. What is the significance of finding the net force?

Finding the net force is important because it allows us to determine the overall effect of multiple forces acting on an object. If the net force is zero, the object will remain at rest or continue moving at a constant velocity. If the net force is not zero, the object will experience acceleration in the direction of the net force.

3. How do you find the direction of the net force?

The direction of the net force is in the same direction as the resulting acceleration of the object. This can be determined by looking at the direction of the individual forces and considering whether they are acting in the same or opposite directions. If the forces are in opposite directions, the net force will be in the direction of the larger force.

4. Can the net force be negative?

Yes, the net force can be negative. This means that the forces acting on an object are in opposite directions and the resulting acceleration is in the opposite direction of the larger force. In this case, the negative sign indicates the direction of the net force, not its magnitude.

5. What units are used to measure the net force?

The net force is measured in Newtons (N). This is the standard unit of force in the International System of Units (SI). Other units used to measure force include pounds (lb) and dynes (dyn), but these are not commonly used in scientific calculations.

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