I Find your ideal quantum interpretation

Demystifier

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Find the interpretation of QM that best suits your personality. You don't need to think much about quantum interpretations to decide which one is the best for you. Just choose one of the offered answers to a couple of questions on the graph. You don't need to think much about the offered answers, just choose the one that feels right intuitively, in your guts.

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A. Neumaier

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Find the interpretation of QM that best suits your personality. You don't need to think much about quantum interpretations to decide which one is the best for you. Just choose one of the offered answers to a couple of questions. You don't need to think much about the offered answers, just choose the one that feels right intuitively, in your guts.
You decision tree is not good: I ended up with Bohmian mechanics, though I find this a very poor interpretation. My thermal interpretation is far better! (The state is not in Hilbert space but a density operator operating on it.)
 
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Demystifier

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Well, I couldn't put all the existing interpretations to the graph, so I put only the most popular ones.

If you had to choose one from the graph, which one would that be?
 

A. Neumaier

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Well, I couldn't put all the existing interpretations to the graph, so I put only the most popular ones.

If you had to choose one from the graph, which one would that be?
Neither; they are all heavily deficient, though in different ways. That's why the interpretation problem is still unsettled.

How did you decide on popularity?
 
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Find the interpretation of QM that best suits your personality.
Wow, it worked for me :smile:. I ended up at the statistical ensemble interpretation, which I do feel closest to. But nevertheless I'm trying to keep my mind open regarding interpretations.
 

Spinnor

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I am in a superposition of the statistical ensemble interpretation and the Nelson stochastic interpretation. I think the choices in the first box are both equally important. I wanted to end up in Bohmian mechanics but I don't think the world is deterministic due to some intrinsic randomness that we will never be able to know. I would like to think a photon "really" goes via one path or another in an interferometer, the energy of a photon is "localized" and remains so until it is annihilated.

Thanks.
 
Find the interpretation of QM that best suits your personality :

if I'm interested in epistemological questions: Qbims
On the other hand, if I'm interested in physics issues: "shut up and calculated",but not for the reason of the decision tree. Just for the interest of understanding the modeling of a physical phenomenon through the language of mathematics.

Now, is "shut up and calculated" an interpretation of Quantum Mechanics !?

I would have put "Is the Moon there when conscious being observe it ?" before 'Is the Moon there when nothing measure it ?" because for us human beings “Lived experience is where we start from and where all must link back to, like a guiding thread”. Accepting the fact that there is something rather than nothing, this does not mean that this something would be such as our consciences present it to us (e.g the Moon).

/Patrick
 
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Ewww, I got 'shut up and calculate'. That is FAR from the interpretation I adhere to.
 
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Shut Up And Calculate is in the very center:smile: because the Moon question can be made meaningless only by means of a very meaningful philosophy!
 

DarMM

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Consistent Histories is usually presented as a Copenhagen style interpretation, explicitly so in the books of Griffiths and Omnès. Also in both it and QBism the Moon is there when nobody looks.

I'd say at the Moon question QBism, Statistical Ensemble, Consistent Histories and Neo-Copenhagen views (e.g. Bub, Healey, Brukner) all branch off from Relational. You'd then need a set of precise questions to separate them.

I think the first one to ask would be:
"Do Probability 1 events represent a sure occurrence?" or something similar like "Given a set of experimental conditions is there a single rational probability assignment?" or even more briefly "Are you a Subjective Bayesian?". That would separate QBism from the others, with QBism being a "No" answer.

EDIT: I actually think "Are experimental outcomes objective facts?" is a better selector for QBism

After that a similar question asking whether you hold a Frequentist view of probability will pull out the Statistical Ensemble view.

Finally "Can Classical Mechanics be derived from QM?" with "No" giving Neo-Copenhagen and "Yes" giving Consistent Histories.

I'm still holding out for my "I wish I could shut up and calculate" interpretation swinging the hearts of the physics community.:smile:
 
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If you follow along the path of clean QM formalism. I would say you would likely end up with Many World on face value. Simply because it is simple. The ontology is simple: all that exists is the wavefunction. The dynamics are simple: the wavefunction obeys unitary evolution according to the Schrodinger equation. Measurement problem is simple: decoherence selects a basis, and the relative state gives you definiteness; both of these are natural quantum processes and don't have to be added in. The derivation of the Born rule for probability is -- well maybe not simple -- but it is elegant: proceeding in analogy to classical Savage decision theory. It is an entirely local theory. It generalizes straightforwardly to quantum field theories... Ok I get it. But my personal bias led me to Relational bec of my GR mentality-- Mirages and Gravitational Effect produces illusions.
 

DarMM

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Measurement problem is simple: decoherence selects a basis, and the relative state gives you definiteness; both of these are natural quantum processes and don't have to be added in. The derivation of the Born rule for probability is -- well maybe not simple -- but it is elegant: proceeding in analogy to classical Savage decision theory. It is an entirely local theory
It really isn't that simple, Wallace's proof is a bit odd defining rationality as almost equivalent to thinking you live in a single world and having a bunch of strange, almost self-contradictory hypotheses about the set of "Quantum Actions" such as irreversibility. This is ignoring the issue that even if it all panned out it's circular. He assumes a branching structure for the proof to work, but branching requires decoherence which requires the Born rule which his proof is attempting to demonstrate, so it's quite circular.

Also as for the "locality" of Many-Worlds, I've never seen a convincing demonstration of this. Even Many-Worlds advocates don't agree on this. Wallace says it is nonlocal, Deutsch says it is local, but like many I don't accept Deutsch's "proof" of this. @Demystifier uses a phrase "alocal" which seems closer to what Many-Worlds is like.
 
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It really isn't that simple, Wallace's proof is a bit odd defining rationality as almost equivalent to thinking you live in a single world and having a bunch of strange, almost self-contradictory hypotheses about the set of "Quantum Actions" such as irreversibility. This is ignoring the issue that even if it all panned out it's circular. He assumes a branching structure for the proof to work, but branching requires decoherence which requires the Born rule which his proof is attempting to demonstrate, so it's quite circular.
That's the reason i say face value, Outside of what is known--Ignoring any philosophical implication(For now). I shouldn't have said "end up". Its the nearest conjecture applying our known contemporary mathematics or dear within the standard formalism of quantum mechanics.
 

Demystifier

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Also in both it and QBism the Moon is there when nobody looks.
It depends on which QBist do you ask. Mermin is a QBist that says that the Moon is not there when nobody looks. Fuchs sometimes says that it is and sometimes (especially when defends locality) that it isn't.
 

DarMM

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It depends on which QBist do you ask. Mermin is a QBist that says that the Moon is not there when nobody looks. Fuchs sometimes says that it is and sometimes (especially when defends locality) that it isn't.
Do you have a link? As that seems different from what Fuchs says in most of what I've read.

As far as I've seen Fuchs says there is an Moon when nobody looks, it just isn't fully mathematically comprehensible (like all things in his view).
 

Demystifier

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Consistent Histories is usually presented as a Copenhagen style interpretation
Perhaps, but it is more ontological than any other Copenhagen style interpretation.
 

Demystifier

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DarMM

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Perhaps, but it is more ontological than any other Copenhagen style interpretation.
Genuinely I don't see it as too different from Bub, Haag, Brukner and Healey in how much ontology it gives, at least from Griffith's and Omnès's books. Omnès for example says Quantum Mechanics doesn't directly model the world as it is, he also describes it as simply an extended form of Copenhagen. I think the real difference between it and other Neo-Copenhagen views is that it supposes Classical Mechanics can be derived from QM rather than that it is more ontological.
 
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Wow, it worked for me :smile:. I ended up at the statistical ensemble interpretation, which I do feel closest to. But nevertheless I'm trying to keep my mind open regarding interpretations.
I tried the ontological branch too, but interestingly I found it very hard to answer the questions;

Is the world completely described by the state in the Hilbert space?
Here I would probably say "no", since I feel answering "yes" would feel a bit like hubris :smile:.

Is the world fundamentally deterministic?
This question I find very hard to answer. Very hard. Because on the one hand the physical world very much appear to follow the rules of causes and effects, but on the other hand we are still stuck with this randomness in QM. But if I really force myself to answer, I'll probably answer "yes", which would make me end up at Bohmian mechanics.
 

A. Neumaier

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It depends on which QBist do you ask. Mermin is a QBist that says that the Moon is not there when nobody looks. Fuchs sometimes says that it is and sometimes (especially when defends locality) that it isn't.
I guess to handle that you need to draw a quantum picture, with an irreducible uncertainty about which interpretation belongs where!
 

DarMM

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https://www.quantamagazine.org/quantum-bayesianism-explained-by-its-founder-20150604/

"My fellow QBists and I instead think that what Bell’s theorem really indicates is that the outcomes of measurements are experiences, not revelations of something that’s already there."
I don't think that's saying there's no external world or that things aren't there when not observed, it's just the standard "measurement creates measurement outcomes" you have in Copenhagen views like Haag's, i.e. the measurement results don't follow predictably from something prior they're a creation of the measurement or Peres's "Unperformed experiments have no results".

I think this paper is fairly clear on laying out that there is an external world out there in QBism:
https://arxiv.org/abs/1601.04360

It's just that world has non-deteministic interactions, i.e. some interactions between the Moon and my equipment are purely associated with that interaction event and not determined prior to it.
 

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