Finding mass of unbalanced meter stick from torque

In summary, the conversation discusses an unbalanced meter stick with a hanging mass of 100g at the 0m point. By moving the fulcrum to the 0.33m point, the stick becomes balanced. The person is trying to calculate the mass of the portion of the meter stick on the right side, but is confused about the moment arm on that side. They calculate the torque on the left side, but their calculation for the mass of the right side does not agree with the actual weighed mass of the stick. They mention that the mass of only part of the meter stick will be less than the mass of the whole stick. A diagram is suggested to help with the calculations.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Unbalanced meter stick has hanging mass of 100g at 0m point. I then moved fulcrum to balance it and it was balanced at the 0.33m point. (The hanging mass and 0m point is on left side)
I want to get the mass of the portion of the meter stick on right side, but I am confused as to what the moment arm on right side would be.
.

Homework Equations


ccw torque = cw torque (balanced stick)

The Attempt at a Solution


The torque on left side is 0.1kg(9.8m/s/s)(0.33m) = .3234NmI think the moment arm for right side is (1 - 0.33)/2 = 0.34m, because center of mass will be at 0.67m point on meter stick.
But when I calculate mass from this, it does not agree with my already weighed mass of stick
mass of meter stick on right side of fulcrum = 0.3234Nm / (9.8m/s/s * 0.34m) = 0.0971
mass of entire meter stick = 0.19kg (weighing it on scale)

I know that the mass of only part of the meter stick will be less than the mass of the whole meter stick, but my values are different by almost 50%. Thanks for any help
 
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  • #2
What about the torque from the left side of the stick?
 
  • #3
A diagram would help.
 
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Related to Finding mass of unbalanced meter stick from torque

What is torque?

Torque is a measure of the force that causes an object to rotate around an axis. It is calculated by multiplying the force applied to an object by the distance from the axis of rotation to the point where the force is applied.

Why do we need to find the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque?

Finding the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque allows us to determine the distribution of mass along the meter stick, which is important for understanding the stability and balance of the object.

How do we find the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque?

To find the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque, we need to measure the distance from the axis of rotation to the point where the force is applied, the magnitude of the force, and the acceleration due to gravity. Then, we can use the equation torque = force * distance to solve for the mass.

What tools are needed to find the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque?

To find the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque, you will need a meter stick, a fulcrum or axis of rotation, a known force, and a way to measure the distance from the axis of rotation to the point where the force is applied (such as a ruler or measuring tape).

How does finding the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque relate to real-world applications?

Finding the mass of an unbalanced meter stick from torque is important in engineering and physics, as it allows us to understand the stability and balance of objects. This information can be applied to various real-world scenarios, such as designing structures, analyzing the movement of objects, and determining the optimal weight distribution in vehicles.

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