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Finding the Force P from Normal Stress

  1. Feb 13, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    In the steel structure shown, a 6‐mm‐diameter pin is used at C and 10‐mm‐diameter pins are
    used at B and D. The ultimate shearing stress is 150 MPa at all connections, and the ultimate normal stress is 400 MPa in link BD. Knowing that a factor of safety of 3.0 is desired, determine the largest load P that can be applied at A. Note that link BD is not reinforced around the pin holes.

    2. Relevant equations

    F.S = σultallow

    σ = F/A

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I understand the parts concernging the ultimate shearing stress, my confusion is with the normal stress.

    When I draw a FBD of beam AB, I assign the force at B, By, to point upwards and the force at C, Cy, to point downwards.

    ƩMc = -By(.120) + P(0.280)

    By = 2.33P

    My question is, does this this result mean that member BD is in compression or tension? Having drawn a FBD of AC I understand that the forces are acting on beam AC, thus while By points in the +y-direction, if I were to draw a FBD of BD, the force, By, would point in the opposite direction thereby indicating that member BD is in tension.

    Hence when I use the normal stress equation

    σ = F/A

    where F is the internal force and A is the cross sectional area, why is the diameter of the pin removed form the width of member BD?
     

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  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 14, 2013 #2

    SteamKing

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    1. Link BD is in tension.

    2. The diameter of the pin is removed from link BD width because that material is not present and cannot be considered when calculating stress. If you look at the pin at point B or D and the link, draw a FBD of the link and make a cut horizontally thru the diameter of the pin. Only the material outside the pin hole can support any load.
     
  4. Feb 14, 2013 #3
    If link BD had been in compression instead of tension, would you still need to remove the diameter of the pin?
     
  5. Feb 14, 2013 #4

    SteamKing

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    If link BD were in compression, then you would have to look at the shear area available to keep pin B from tearing out of the pinhole. In this case, a vertical cut on either side of the pin thru the link would be analyzed to determine how much area is able to resist the tendency of the pin to shear thru the end of the link.

    If there is sufficient shear area and the pin is OK, then buckling of the link itself should be checked.
     
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