Finding the Perfect Self-Study Book for Intro Stats & Quantum Mechanics

In summary: Quantum Mechanics: A Paradigms Approach by McIntyreA Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics by Townsend
  • #1
Kashmir
468
74
Can you please suggest a good introductory statistical and quantum mechanics book which can be self studied.

My math background :
I've done multivariate calculus, vector calculus, linear algebra ,some complex analysis all at the usual undergraduate level.

The books I've self studied thus far are:

1) Mechanics : Kleppner and Kolenkow
2) Electrodynamics : Griffiths
3)Mathematical method: Boas
4) Classical mechanics : Goldstein ( just finished 4th chapter after so much
labor) -) Quantum mechanics :Griffiths ( I stopped after 2nd chapter, I felt I wanted a little bit more rigorous book that uses bra ket) As you can see I'm lacking in quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, so with my current background could you please suggest book on quantum mechanics and statistical mechanic which are easier to self study.

Thank you.
 
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  • #2
Kashmir said:
Can you please suggest a good introductory statistical and quantum mechanics book which can be self studied.

My math background :
I've done multivariate calculus, vector calculus, linear algebra ,some complex analysis all at the usual undergraduate level.

The books I've self studied thus far are:

1) Mechanics : Kleppner and Kolenkow
2) Electrodynamics : Griffiths
3)Mathematical method: Boas
4) Classical mechanics : Goldstein ( just finished 4th chapter after so much
labor)-) Quantum mechanics :Griffiths ( I stopped after 2nd chapter, I felt I wanted a little bit more rigorous book that uses bra ket)As you can see I'm lacking in quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, so with my current background could you please suggest book on quantum mechanics and statistical mechanic which are easier to self study.

Thank you.
Quantum Mechanics: A Paradigms Approach by McIntyre

A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics by Townsend
 
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  • #5
Kashmir said:
Can you please suggest a good introductory statistical and quantum mechanics book which can be self studied.

My math background :
I've done multivariate calculus, vector calculus, linear algebra ,some complex analysis all at the usual undergraduate level.

The books I've self studied thus far are:

1) Mechanics : Kleppner and Kolenkow
2) Electrodynamics : Griffiths
3)Mathematical method: Boas
4) Classical mechanics : Goldstein ( just finished 4th chapter after so much
labor)-) Quantum mechanics :Griffiths ( I stopped after 2nd chapter, I felt I wanted a little bit more rigorous book that uses bra ket)As you can see I'm lacking in quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, so with my current background could you please suggest book on quantum mechanics and statistical mechanic which are easier to self study.

Thank you.
Quantum mechanics:
J. J. Sakurai and S. Tuan, Modern Quantum Mechanics,
Addison Wesley (1993).

The newer one coauthored by Napolitano seems to have kept most of the beauty of this one but has added a chapter on so-called "relativistic quantum mechanics", which I recommend NOT to read, because relativsitic QT should be learned as quantum field theory right away. With Sakurai for non-relativistic QT you are well-prepared to do so if you wish (e.g., using Schwartz's or Peskin&Schroeder's textbooks).

Statistical mechanics:
L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Course of Theoretical
Physics Volume V, Pergamon Press (1980).
 
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  • #6
vanhees71 said:
Quantum mechanics:
J. J. Sakurai and S. Tuan, Modern Quantum Mechanics,
Addison Wesley (1993).

The newer one coauthored by Napolitano seems to have kept most of the beauty of this one but has added a chapter on so-called "relativistic quantum mechanics", which I recommend NOT to read, because relativsitic QT should be learned as quantum field theory right away. With Sakurai for non-relativistic QT you are well-prepared to do so if you wish (e.g., using Schwartz's or Peskin&Schroeder's textbooks).

Statistical mechanics:
L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Course of Theoretical
Physics Volume V, Pergamon Press (1980).
Thank you for your advice but I'm a bit scared since I've learned on the internet that both of the texts you advise are not suitable for an person first encountering these subjects, or is it that with the background I've mentioned you think I'm good to go with these texts?
 
  • #7
I'd say so. Of course, it's always good, to check any book, whether it's good for you, e.g., at a library etc. before buying them. After all textbooks are quite expensive :-(.
 
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  • #8
vanhees71 said:
I'd say so. Of course, it's always good, to check any book, whether it's good for you, e.g., at a library etc. before buying them. After all textbooks are quite expensive :-(.
That's true. I think Knowledge should not cost anything in terms of money, it's above money.
 
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  • #9
Kashmir said:
Thank you for your advice, is there any additional video lecture or any other material that might help me?
Assuming you know basic linear algebra, you should just start with one of those two books. I do not think you would need additional video lectures. I would start with McIntyre.
 
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  • #10
smodak said:
Assuming you know basic linear algebra, you should just start with one of those two books. I do not think you would need additional video lectures. I would start with McIntyre.
Yes I've self studied linear algebra from Gilbert strang almost done till Jordan canonical form.
Thank you for pointing me the way.
Happy learning sir :)
 
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  • #11
Kashmir said:
Any advice on stat mech?
I do not have any specific recommendations on statistical mechanics, hoping others could chime in. I agree with your assesment that Sakurai and Landau, although phenomenal books, may be a little too much for a first encounter.
 
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  • #12
I
smodak said:
I do not have any specific recommendations on statistical mechanics, hoping others could chime in.
I liked Reif forty odd years ago. I think it, in conjunction with Landau, might be a good combination (and you should be able to find lots of used copies cheap).
 
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  • #13
hutchphd said:
I

I liked Reif forty odd years ago. I think it, in conjunction with Landau, might be a good combination (and you should be able to find lots of used copies cheap).
Thank you for your comment. Could you please tell me Which reif it is? The Berkeley one or the other one?
 
  • #14
https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/fundamentals-of-statistical-and-thermal-physics-mcgraw-hill-series-in-fundamentals-of-physics_frederick-reif/275192/item/4243874/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAy4eNBhCaARIsAFDVtI2UgghEsFkcnAwNSFE3pJ6b_vpFXI0_8rx9zqukmQ9e1gjb43K7LT8aAm_YEALw_wcB#idiq=4243874&edition=2340290
My guess is that the Berkeley one is similar but I've not seen it.
 
  • #15
hutchphd said:
https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/fundamentals-of-statistical-and-thermal-physics-mcgraw-hill-series-in-fundamentals-of-physics_frederick-reif/275192/item/4243874/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAy4eNBhCaARIsAFDVtI2UgghEsFkcnAwNSFE3pJ6b_vpFXI0_8rx9zqukmQ9e1gjb43K7LT8aAm_YEALw_wcB#idiq=4243874&edition=2340290
My guess is that the Berkeley one is similar but I've not seen it.
Thelink you've shared isn't the Berkeley one.
The Berkeley one is little more basic is that one you meant?
 
  • #16
I did not use the Berkeley one. I used the first edition as shown..
 
  • #17
That's the "big Reif", which is a very good book on statistical physics and thermodynamics. The Berkeley Physics course volume on statistical physics is the "little Reif" and (at least) as good as the big one. I'd say the former is graduate the latter undergraduate level. I find both very good books on the challenging topic of statistical physics.
 
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Related to Finding the Perfect Self-Study Book for Intro Stats & Quantum Mechanics

1. How do I determine which self-study book is best for me?

Choosing the right self-study book for intro stats and quantum mechanics will depend on your individual learning style and goals. Consider factors such as the level of detail, practice problems, and supplementary materials included in the book. You may also want to read reviews and ask for recommendations from others who have used the book.

2. Can I use one self-study book for both intro stats and quantum mechanics?

While some books may cover both subjects, it is recommended to use separate books for intro stats and quantum mechanics. These are two distinct fields with different concepts and methodologies, so using separate books will provide a more comprehensive understanding of each subject.

3. Are there any specific features I should look for in a self-study book?

Some features to look for in a self-study book for intro stats and quantum mechanics include clear explanations, a variety of practice problems with solutions, and real-world examples. It may also be helpful to choose a book that offers online resources such as interactive exercises or video tutorials.

4. How much time should I dedicate to self-studying with the book?

The amount of time you should dedicate to self-studying with the book will depend on your individual learning pace and the complexity of the subject matter. It is important to set aside dedicated study time each day or week and to stay consistent with your schedule. It may also be helpful to break down the material into smaller, manageable chunks.

5. Can I use a self-study book as my only resource for learning intro stats and quantum mechanics?

While self-study books can be a valuable resource, it is recommended to supplement your learning with other resources such as online tutorials, lectures, or study groups. This will provide a well-rounded understanding of the subjects and allow for clarification of any difficult concepts.

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