For those of us Who get stuck in a Hole

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    Hole Stuck
In summary: The circumference becomes infinite. So the radial force decreases at a constant velocity as the circumference increases.
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  • #2
It reminds me the "circle of death" (not sure if that's the official name for it), performed with car or motorcycle, e.g. in circus performance demos ...
Same concept ... , but a lot more dangerous and risky.
[Likewise, don't try this at home.]
 
  • #3
I expect someone will be along soon to work out the largest diameter hole a man can escape from using this trick.
 
  • #4
CWatters said:
a man
You mean a human ... (man or woman etc. ...)
It won't be precise. What if he or she is an athlete? ...
 
  • #5
Stavros Kiri said:
It won't be precise. What if he or she is an athlete? ...
There would still be a physical limit as the curvature lessens with larger diameter. Take the "circle of death" analogy and imagine how far up the cone you could drive before your traction runs out...
 
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  • #6
Stavros Kiri said:
It reminds me the "circle of death" (not sure if that's the official name for it), performed with car or motorcycle, e.g. in circus performance demos ...
Funny - that did not come to mind. It reminded me of the stretched fabric, ie trampoline, with a heavy ball in the middle making a depression, with a marble circling around to show 'gravitational attraction' and the 'bending of space-time'. Except in reverse. this guy is showing escape velocity, conversion of kinetic energy to potential, and/or a condition of repulsive gravity. And of course something to do with black holes ( actually the hole was grey in the video - maybe there is such a thing ), and something else to do with the discrete quantized force acting between objects ( since the guy is only laying down a foot one at a time ). :biggrin:
 
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  • #7
jerromyjon said:
There would still be a physical limit as the curvature lessens with larger diameter. Take the "circle of death" analogy and imagine how far up the cone you could drive before your traction runs out...
What's a flared cone where the angle of the sides becomes more and more horizontal?
The diameter becomes infinite. Not.
Should still be a limit, above which on the slope one can stand, but below which one must run around so as to not fall in.
 
  • #8
256bits said:
What's a flared cone where the angle of the sides becomes more and more horizontal?
Not a flared cone, a linear one. When the circumference gets larger the radial force decreases at a constant velocity...
 
  • #9
jerromyjon said:
Not a flared cone, a linear one. When the circumference gets larger the radial force decreases at a constant velocity...
Agreed.
A flared cone is an extension of the problem from linear.
 

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