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Force from a Kinetic Energy Function

  1. Oct 23, 2013 #1
    Say you're given a function that represents the kinetic energy of some object, what would you have to do to derive the force from that function? I know that for motion along a straight line a conservative force F(x) is the negative derivative of its associated potential energy function U, but what is there to do if the function is one of kinetic energy?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Conservation of energy and the work-energy relation will be useful in such cases.
    You usually will need more information than kinetic energy with position alone.
    Do you have an example.

    Note: For a conservative field, the force on an object at a position is the negative gradient of the potential energy function at that position. Motion does not have to be along a straight line.
     
  4. Oct 23, 2013 #3
    You posted this same thing in the homework section. :confused:
    I mean the OP, of course.
     
  5. Oct 23, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

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  6. Oct 23, 2013 #5
    Ok, now we have an infinite loop. :smile:
    I can go forever between the two threads, by using your links.
     
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