Force from a Kinetic Energy Function

  • Thread starter Dustinc
  • Start date
  • #1
3
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

Say you're given a function that represents the kinetic energy of some object, what would you have to do to derive the force from that function? I know that for motion along a straight line a conservative force F(x) is the negative derivative of its associated potential energy function U, but what is there to do if the function is one of kinetic energy?
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Simon Bridge
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
17,848
1,645
Conservation of energy and the work-energy relation will be useful in such cases.
You usually will need more information than kinetic energy with position alone.
Do you have an example.

Note: For a conservative field, the force on an object at a position is the negative gradient of the potential energy function at that position. Motion does not have to be along a straight line.
 
  • #3
3,740
417
You posted this same thing in the homework section. :confused:
I mean the OP, of course.
 
  • #5
3,740
417
Ok, now we have an infinite loop. :smile:
I can go forever between the two threads, by using your links.
 

Related Threads on Force from a Kinetic Energy Function

Replies
2
Views
781
Replies
10
Views
90K
Replies
1
Views
598
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
665
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
Top