Franklin's lightning bells. Easy Question.

In summary, the conversation discusses the Franklin's lightning bells experiment and the changes that would occur if the metal bell on the left was not grounded but connected to an insulator. It is determined that without the metal pole leading to the ground, the bell would not receive any electrons and the ball would remain negatively charged.
  • #1
shimizua
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Franklin's lightning bells. Easy Question. Please Help!

Homework Statement


Assume (for this part only) that the metal bell on the left was not grounded but connected to an insulator. Describe the changes as compared to question 4.
So the franklin lighting bells experiment has a bell on the right attached to a lightning rod, a metal ball on the left of it and then on the left of the ball is another metal bell that is attached to a metal pole leading to the ground.
I know that when the bell on the right is struck by lightning the negative charges are transferred to the bell and then attracts the positive charges from the ball which transfers negative charges to the ball that then move to the bell on the right and transfers negative charges to the bell on the right and the electrons flow to the ground.
So now with an insulator around the pole for the bell that leads to the ground what would happen. I believe that the bell would not gain any electrons and the ball would stay negatively charged. just wanted to check though.
 
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  • #2
Homework Equations N/AThe Attempt at a SolutionYes, that is correct. Without the metal pole attached to the bell on the left and leading to the ground, the bell would not receive any electrons and the ball would remain negatively charged.
 
  • #3


I can confirm that your understanding is correct. By placing an insulator around the pole that leads to the ground, the bell on the left will not be able to transfer any electrons to the ground. This means that the ball will remain negatively charged and the bell on the right will not receive any negative charges. Therefore, there will be no flow of electrons to the ground and the bell on the right will not ring. This is because an insulator does not allow the flow of electricity, so the negative charges cannot be transferred to the ground. This is an important aspect to consider in the Franklin's lightning bells experiment, as it highlights the role of grounding in protecting against lightning strikes.
 

Related to Franklin's lightning bells. Easy Question.

What are Franklin's lightning bells?

Franklin's lightning bells are a set of four metal bells that were used in an experiment by Benjamin Franklin to prove that lightning is a form of electricity.

How did Franklin use his lightning bells in his experiment?

In his experiment, Franklin hung the four bells from a metal rod attached to a kite. When lightning struck the kite, the electricity traveled down the string and caused the bells to ring.

What did Franklin's experiment with the lightning bells prove?

Franklin's experiment proved that lightning is a form of electricity, and it also showed that it can be harnessed and controlled.

Are Franklin's lightning bells still used in scientific experiments today?

No, Franklin's lightning bells are not used in scientific experiments today. However, they are still used as a symbol to represent the discovery of electricity.

How did Franklin's experiment with the lightning bells impact the scientific community?

Franklin's experiment with the lightning bells was a groundbreaking discovery that helped to advance the understanding of electricity and its properties. It also paved the way for further research and innovations in the field of electricity.

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